L-carnitine significantly improves patient outcomes following heart attack

April 12, 2013, Elsevier

L-carnitine significantly improves cardiac health in patients after a heart attack, say a multicenter team of investigators in a study published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Their findings, based on analysis of key controlled trials, associate L-carnitine with significant reduction in death from all causes and a highly significant reduction in ventricular arrhythmias and anginal attacks following a heart attack, compared with placebo or control.

disease is the leading cause of death in the United States. Although many of the therapies developed in recent decades have markedly improved life expectancy, adverse such as ventricular arrhythmias and angina attacks still occur frequently after an acute myocardial infarction (heart attack).

It is known that during ischemic events L-carnitine levels are depleted. Investigators sought to determine the effects of targeting cardiac using L-carnitine to improve free fatty and glucose oxidation in these patients. By performing a systematic review and meta-analysis of the available studies published over several decades, they looked at the role of L-carnitine compared with placebo or control in patients experiencing an acute myocardial infarction.

L-carnitine is a trimethylamine which occurs in high amounts in red meat and is found in certain other foods, and is also widely available as an over-the-counter nutritional supplement which is claimed to improve energy, weight loss, and athletic performance. Its potential role in treating heart disease was first reported in the late 1970s.

A comprehensive literature search yielded 153 studies, 13, published from 1989-2007, were deemed eligible. All the trials were comparison trials of L-carnitine compared with placebo or control in the setting of acute myocardial infarction.

This systematic review of the 13 controlled trials in 3,629 patients, involving 250 deaths, 220 cases of failure, and 38 recurrent heart attacks, found that L-carnitine was associated with:

  • Significant 27% reduction in all-cause mortality (number needed to treat 38)
  • Highly significant 65% reduction in ventricular arrhythmias (number needed to treat 4)
  • Significant 40% reduction in the development of angina (number needed to treat 3)
  • Reduction in infarct size
There were numerically fewer myocardial reinfarctions and cases associated with L-carnitine, but this did not reach statistical significance.

First author James J. DiNicolantonio, PharmD, Wegmans Pharmacy, Ithaca, NY, observes, "Although therapies for acute coronary syndrome (ACS), including percutaneous coronary intervention, dual antiplatelet therapy, b-blockers (BBs), statins, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs), omega-3 fatty acids, and cardiac rehabilitation, have markedly improved clinical outcomes, adverse cardiovascular (CV) events still occur too frequently after ACS. One promising therapy for improving involves using L-carnitine to improve free fatty acid levels and glucose oxidation."

"The potential mechanisms responsible for the observed beneficial impact of L-carnitine in acute myocardial infarction are likely multifactorial and may, in part, be conferred through the ability of L-carnitine to improve mitochondrial energy metabolism in the heart by facilitating the transport of long-chain fatty acids from the cytosol to the mitochondrial matrix, where b-oxidation occurs, removing toxic fatty acid intermediates, reducing ischemia induced by long-chain fatty acid concentrations, and replenishing depleted carnitine concentrations seen in ischemic, infarcted, and failing myocardium," says DiNicolantonio.

L-carnitine is proven to be safe and is readily available over the counter. The investigators agree that the overall results of this meta-analysis support the potential use of L-carnitine in acute myocardial infarction and possibly in secondary coronary prevention and treatment, including angina. They advocate for a larger randomized, multicenter trial to be performed to confirm these results in the modern era of routine revascularization and other intensive medical therapies following acute myocardial infarction. But, says DiNicolantonio, "L-carnitine therapy can already be considered in selected patients with high-risk or persistent angina after acute who cannot tolerate treatment with ACE inhibitors or beta blockers, considering its low cost and excellent safety profile."

These findings may seem to contradict those reported in a study published earlier this month in Nature Medicine by Robert A. Koeth and others (Koeth, R. A. et al. Nature Med. http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nm.3145), which demonstrated that metabolism by intestinal microbiota of dietary L-carnitine produced trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) and accelerated atherosclerosis in mice. They also noted that omnivorous human subjects produced more TMAO than did vegans or vegetarians following ingestion of L-carnitine, and suggested a possible direct link between L-carnitine, gut bacteria, TMAO, and atherosclerosis and risk of ischemic heart disease.

"The Nature Medicine paper is of interest," agrees senior investigator Carl J. Lavie, M.D.,FACC,FACP,FCCP, Medical Director of the Cardiac Rehabilitation and Prevention Center at the John Ochsner Heart and Vascular Institute at the University of Queensland School of Medicine in New Orleans, "but the main study reported there was in animals, and unlike our study, lacks hard outcomes." He also notes that "there are various forms of 'carnitine' and our relatively large meta-analysis specifically tested L-carnitine on hard outcomes in humans who had already experienced ."

Explore further: L-carnitine does not reduce cancer-related fatigue

More information: "L-Carnitine in the Secondary Prevention of Cardiovascular Disease: Systematic Review and Meta-analysis," by James J. DiNicolantonio, PharmD; Carl J. Lavie, MD; Hassan Fares, MD; Arthur R. Menezes, MD; and James H. O'Keefe, MD, Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Volume 88, Issue 6 (June 2013), dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.02.007

Related Stories

L-carnitine does not reduce cancer-related fatigue

September 18, 2012
(HealthDay)—Patients with invasive malignancies who take L-carnitine supplements do not experience a reduction in fatigue, pain, or depression, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Clinical ...

Researchers discover new link between heart disease and red meat

April 7, 2013
A compound abundant in red meat and added as a supplement to popular energy drinks has been found to promote atherosclerosis – or the hardening or clogging of the arteries – according to Cleveland Clinic research published ...

Supplement burns muscle fat, improves exercise performance

June 30, 2011
A new study has shown for the first time that taking a particular food supplement increases muscle carnitine content and reduces muscle carbohydrate use, while increasing fat used for energy production during exercise.

Study: Blood transfusion associated with increased risk of death for patients with heart attack

December 24, 2012
A meta-analysis of 10 studies suggests that receipt of a blood transfusion among patients with myocardial infarction (heart attack) was associated with increased all-cause mortality compared with not receiving a blood transfusion ...

What do patients receiving optimal medical therapy after a heart attack die from?

August 30, 2011
Because of improved management at the acute stage, the risk of dying in hospital after a heart attack has decreased by about 50% in the past 10 years. Likewise, the prescription of recommended medications when patients leave ...

Recommended for you

Biomechanical mapping method aids development of therapies for damaged heart tissue

January 23, 2018
Researchers have developed a new way to capture the detailed biomechanical properties of heart tissue. The high-resolution optical technique fills an important technology gap necessary to develop and test therapies that might ...

Researchers borrow from AIDS playbook to tackle rheumatic heart disease

January 22, 2018
Billions of US taxpayer dollars have been invested in Africa over the past 15 years to improve care for millions suffering from the HIV/AIDS epidemic; yet health systems on the continent continue to struggle. What if the ...

A nanoparticle inhalant for treating heart disease

January 18, 2018
A team of researchers from Italy and Germany has developed a nanoparticle inhalant for treating people suffering from heart disease. In their paper published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, the group describes ...

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

January 15, 2018
Starting periods early—before the age of 12—is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

'Decorated' stem cells could offer targeted heart repair

January 10, 2018
Although cardiac stem cell therapy is a promising treatment for heart attack patients, directing the cells to the site of an injury - and getting them to stay there - remains challenging. In a new pilot study using an animal ...

Exercise is good for the heart, high blood pressure is bad—researchers find out why

January 10, 2018
When the heart is put under stress during exercise, it is considered healthy. Yet stress due to high blood pressure is bad for the heart. Why? And is this always the case? Researchers of the German Centre for Cardiovascular ...

3 comments

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

satyricon
1 / 5 (2) Apr 13, 2013
These two studies results are in conflict with each other. Which is it? I have stopped my supplements containing L-Canitine because of the The Nature Medicine paper. Not sure if I have done the right thing.
Wolf358
not rated yet Apr 13, 2013
I had the same concerrns; perhaps this addresses it:

(from the article) He also notes that "there are various forms of 'carnitine' and our relatively large meta-analysis specifically tested L-carnitine on hard outcomes in humans who had already experienced acute myocardial infarction."

DrNutrients
1 / 5 (3) Apr 14, 2013
Who to believe?

Dr. Josh Bloom from the American Council on Science and Health thinks this is a no-brainer: "The Cleveland Clinic study measured the effects of TMAO in mice, and used limited epidemiological evidence to link this to humans, including a fair amount of speculation. " He continues, "On the other hand, the Mayo Clinic Proceedings study has actually discovered a very well-defined benefit for heart attack patients, with very good statistics to back up their findings."

I agree with Dr. Bloom when weighing the importance of these two studies. Curiously, the Cleveland Clinic group also published animal study back in 2011 arguing that choline from meat causes heart disease! If this group is so determined to establish a link between eating meat and heart disease they should focus their attention on more likely culprits found in corporate produced meats like dioxins, growth hormones, antibiotics, GMO byproducts & high omega6 fatty acids.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.