Mums giving babies solid foods later, research shows

April 10, 2013

Australian mums have been given a tick of approval when it comes to choosing the right time to give their babies solid foods.

Research at The University of Queensland's Queensland Centre for Mothers & Babies (QCMB) has shown a dramatic decrease in the rate of the early introduction of solids, which is in line with current health recommendations.

Researcher Dr Wendy Brodribb said the results complemented recommendations of the World Health Organisation and the National Health and Medical Research Council that solids should not be given to babies until around six .

"Since the recommended time for the introduction of solids in Australia changed from four to six months, to six months in 2003, there has been a significant reduction in the proportion of infants given solids by 17 weeks," she said.

"At that time 44 percent of infants had been given solids compared to 8.6 percent in our study."

Dr Brodribb said it was pleasing to see these changes, as health professionals agreed other foods and fluids should not be introduced to either breast or formula-fed infants before 17 weeks because of an increased risk of infection, obesity and allergy.

She said although many Australian women were still introducing solids before the recommended six months (56.2 percent at five months), this figure was also much lower than in 2001 when 88 percent of infants had received solids by 26 weeks.

Dr Brodribb said the study found that if were given water early in their life, they were more likely to be given solids as well.

The research, titled "Introducing Solids and Water to Australian ," has been published in the Journal of Human Lactation.

The study is based on data from the QCMB's Having a Baby In Queensland Survey program, a biannual survey of thousands of Queensland , run in conjunction with the Registry of Births, Deaths and Marriages.

Explore further: Four in 10 babies given solid foods too early, study finds

More information: DOI: 10.1177/0890334413478177

Related Stories

Four in 10 babies given solid foods too early, study finds

March 25, 2013
(HealthDay)—Child development experts advise parents not to introduce solid foods, such as baby cereal, into an infant's diet until the infant is at least 4 to 6 months old. However, new research suggests that about 40 ...

QCMB research examines the myths behind Queensland’s rising caesarean rates

January 18, 2012
Researchers from UQ's Queensland Centre for Mothers & Babies have explored the reasons for the rising rates of caesarean sections in Queensland.

Queensland mums to have their say on maternity care

May 1, 2012
Queensland mums are being given the opportunity to have their voices heard on maternity care in Queensland.

Recommended for you

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

High-dose vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles for children

July 18, 2017
Giving children high doses of vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles, a new study has found.

Scientists develop new supplement that can repair, rejuvenate muscles in older adults

July 18, 2017
Whey protein supplements aren't just for gym buffs according to new research from McMaster university. When taken on a regular basis, a combination of these and other ingredients in a ready-to-drink formula have been found ...

Study: Eating at 'wrong time' affects body weight, circadian rhythms

July 18, 2017
A new high-precision feeding system for lab mice reinforces the idea that the time of day food is eaten is more critical to weight loss than the amount of calories ingested.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.