Researchers find there is no single sexy chin

April 9, 2013

A new Dartmouth College global study finds significant geographic differences in chin shapes.

There is no single sexy chin.

That's the conclusion of a new Dartmouth College global study of male and female preferences for of the opposite sex. The results, which contradict the notion that human beauty is universal, are published in the journal PLOS ONE.

The researchers studied chin shapes among 180 male and female skeletons in nine areas in Australia, Africa, Asia, and Europe to test the universal hypothesis. The hypothesis proposes that some facial features are universally preferred by the opposite sex because they are reliable signals of mate quality.

But the researchers found significant in the chin shapes. The results challenge Darwin's theory, at least with regard to chin shape, that sexual selection results in the proliferation of physical characteristics that provide a competitive advantage in the struggle to find mates.

"If preferences for particular chin shapes are universal in the strict sense, and these preferences influence the evolution of the chin, then chin shapes should not differ significantly between geographic regions," the authors wrote. "But our results suggest that chin shape is geographically variable in both sexes, challenging the notion of universal sexual selection on chin shape."

Explore further: Chin implant surgery skyrockets in US

More information: www.plosone.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0060681

Related Stories

Chin implant surgery skyrockets in US

April 16, 2012

Cosmetic surgery to make the chin look more prominent has soared in popularity in the course of a year, making it the fastest growing trend among men and women, US plastic surgeons said on Monday.

Study examines combo chin, nose plastic surgery

March 15, 2013

(HealthDay)—For patients considering plastic surgery to correct their facial profile, changing the nose and chin simultaneously may provide the most satisfying results, Italian researchers say.

Recommended for you

Study reveals areas of the brain impacted by PTSD

January 23, 2017

Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) and the VA Boston Healthcare System are one step closer to understanding the specific nature of brain changes associated with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

Where belief in free will is linked to happiness

January 23, 2017

Western and Asian cultures tend to have different core beliefs around free will. In a recent study published in Frontiers in Psychology, Jingguang Li, professor at Dali University, and his research team show the link between ...

For health and happiness, share good news

January 22, 2017

Service members, including both active and recently separated, have been called upon to fight overseas and to assist during natural disasters at home. They can face unique challenges when they return in both the workplace ...

The great unknown—risk-taking behaviour in adolescents

January 19, 2017

Adolescents are more likely to ignore information that could prompt them to rethink risky decisions. This may explain why information campaigns on risky behaviors such as drug abuse tend to have only limited success. These ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.