Shrinks, critics face off over psychiatric manual

May 15, 2013 by Lindsey Tanner
This undated image shows the cover of the revised American Psychiatric Association's guidebook of mental disorders being released in May 2013. It is the manual's first major update in nearly 20 years, but prominent critics say the APA is out of control, turning common human problems into mental illness in a trend they say will just make the "pop-a-pill" culture worse. (AP Photo/American Psychiatric Association)

(AP)—There's a new version of the world's most widely used psychiatric manual, and it's already getting lots of criticism.

Some prominent therapists and others complain that the manual turns normal conditions into mental illnesses. They say it will only make the "pop-a-pill" culture worse.

At issue is the fifth edition of the , widely known as the DSM-5. The DSM has long been considered the authoritative source for diagnosing mental problems.

The is releasing the manual this weekend at its annual meeting in San Francisco. Protesters hope to steal the show.

Explore further: Social considerations not accounted for in DSM-5

Related Stories

Social considerations not accounted for in DSM-5

May 14, 2013

(HealthDay)—Social and population variations in mental diagnosis are not accounted for in the newly revised fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), according to an editorial published ...

Psychiatric group: Parental alienation no disorder

September 21, 2012

(AP)—Rebuffing an intensive lobbying campaign, a task force of the American Psychiatric Association has decided not to list the disputed concept of parental alienation in the updated version of its catalog of mental disorders.

Experts say psychiatry's diagnostic manual needs overhaul

May 16, 2012

The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), long the master reference work in psychiatry, is seriously flawed and needs radical change from its current "field guide" form, according to an essay by two ...

How the DSM-5 has come to grief

April 3, 2013

(Medical Xpress)—Widespread confusion about what constitutes grief, 'normaI' depression and clinical depression risks being exacerbated under the American Psychiatry Association's newest classification system, professor ...

Recommended for you

The great unknown—risk-taking behaviour in adolescents

January 19, 2017

Adolescents are more likely to ignore information that could prompt them to rethink risky decisions. This may explain why information campaigns on risky behaviors such as drug abuse tend to have only limited success. These ...

Mandarin makes you more musical?

January 18, 2017

Mandarin makes you more musical - and at a much earlier age than previously thought. That's the suggestion of a new study from the University of California San Diego. But hold on there, overachiever parents, don't' rush just ...

Adoptees advantaged by birth language memory

January 18, 2017

Language learning very early on in life can be subconsciously retained even when no conscious knowledge of the early experience remains. The subconscious knowledge can then be tapped to speed up learning of the pronunciation ...

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

YawningDog
not rated yet May 16, 2013
If you're one of the gullible who think the psychiatric profession is competent, I challenge you to look up "The Thud Test".

This is not to imply there are not people who need help. It's just to prove that psychiatrists, as a group, are full of sh*t.

Psychoanalysis was "developed" by a cocaine fueled sex addict in a fevered quest for fame, fortune, professional glory and self aggrandizement. Since then it's been, monkey see, monkey do.

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.