Peru cracks down on junk food in schools

May 17, 2013

Peru's president signed a new law Thursday designed to reduce child obesity by encouraging healthier eating habits in schools.

The law regulates advertising for fatty foods and fizzy in schools, the first step in a plan to ban some junk food altogether.

Business groups, worried about their revenue, have reacted angrily to the plans.

But President Ollanta Humala told them: "We cannot view our children as simply a market to generate sales and maximize profits."

One feature of the new law is a plan to set up stands selling quinoa, an ancient and healthy Andean grain, in schools.

Advertising will be regulated to ban those that encourage immoderate consumption of food and non-alcoholic beverages loaded with , sugar, salt and saturated fats, the law says.

The Peruvian Economics Institute derided the law as intrusive and heavy handed.

But the Peruvian Medical Association's president Juan Villena backed it: it was as important to regulate ads for junk food as it was ads for cigarettes, he argued.

Humala has said the law has international support and puts Peru on the cutting edge of healthy food legislation in the Andean region.

Explore further: Most obese US state bans food portion restrictions

Related Stories

Most obese US state bans food portion restrictions

March 19, 2013
The most obese state in the U.S. now says local governments can't restrict the sizes of food or drink portions.

New rules aim to get rid of junk foods in schools

February 2, 2013
Almost all candy, high-calorie drinks and greasy meals could soon be on a food blacklist in the nation's schools.

Regulation of junk food advertising has minimal impact

October 3, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Researchers at the University of Liverpool have found that regulations introduced to reduce children's exposure to junk food advertising have not had a significant impact.

Study reveals parents not immune to junk food adverstising

May 3, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—The idea that adults are better equipped than children to resist junk food advertising has been debunked by a new study that has found both are influenced by television and Internet advertising.

Recommended for you

Why sugary drinks and protein-rich meals don't go well together

July 20, 2017
Having a sugar-sweetened drink with a high-protein meal may negatively affect energy balance, alter food preferences and cause the body to store more fat, according to a study published in the open access journal BMC Nutrition.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

High-dose vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles for children

July 18, 2017
Giving children high doses of vitamin D doesn't appear to reduce the winter sniffles, a new study has found.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.