US approves radiation-based prostate cancer drug

May 15, 2013

(AP)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new injectable drug that uses radiation to treat advanced prostate cancer that has spread to the bones.

The FDA said Wednesday it approved the drug, Xofigo from Bayer Pharmaceuticals, for men whose cancer has grown into bone tumors even after receiving medication or surgery to lower testosterone. The hormone spurs growth of .

Regulators approved Xofigo based on a study of 809 men with advanced prostate cancer who received the drug or placebo. Patients taking Xofigo typically lived 14 months compared to 11.2 months for those taking placebo.

Xofigo's side effects include nausea and diarrhea.

Explore further: FDA expands approval of Bayer cancer drug (Update)

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