Young vets with PTSD receive more CT scans

May 2, 2013
Young vets with PTSD receive more CT scans
Computed tomography scans are significantly more commonly used in young veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to young veterans without PTSD, according to research published in the May issue of Radiology.

(HealthDay)—Computed tomography (CT) scans are significantly more commonly used in young veterans with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) compared to young veterans without PTSD, according to research published in the May issue of Radiology.

Thad E. Abrams, M.D., from the Veterans Rural Health Resource Center-Central Region in Iowa City, Iowa, and colleagues retrospectively analyzed data regarding health care utilization and , including PTSD, from a national sample of new veteran enrollees (aged 18 to 35 years).

The researchers found that 13.0 percent received at least one CT scan and PTSD was identified in 21.1 percent of the cohort (76,812 participants). Of the veterans with PTSD, 22.9 percent (3,711 of 16,182) received at least one CT scan, compared with 10.4 percent (6,307 of 60,630) of veterans without PTSD (P < 0.0001). Comorbid conditions that significantly explained the association between CT scans and PTSD were traumatic brain injury (odds ratio [OR], 3.54), abdominal pain (OR, 4.01), and headaches (OR, 3.07). Similarly, significant associations were seen for high levels of emergency room (OR, 2.73) and primary care (OR, 2.38) utilization. Prior to the diagnosis of PTSD, the daily chance of receiving a CT scan was seven times higher (daily chance, 0.007 before versus 0.001 after).

"These findings reveal an association between utilization and PTSD in young veterans presenting with somatic complaints," the authors write. "To optimize appropriate CT utilization, the results of this study highlight the need for future research to determine why so many CT scans are being obtained in patients with ."

Explore further: PTSD linked to urinary incontinence in female veterans

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

PTSD linked to urinary incontinence in female veterans

June 1, 2012
(HealthDay) -- Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is independently associated with urgency/mixed urinary incontinence (UI) symptoms in female veterans, according to a study published in the June issue of the American Journal ...

PTSD linked to increase risk in heart disease

June 1, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- New research by Dr. Ramin Ebrahimi and his team from the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Administration Medical Center was published in The American Journal of Cardiology and shows a link between post-traumatic ...

In veterans with RA, PTSD worsens disease activity

February 13, 2013
(HealthDay)—For U.S. veterans with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), a diagnosis of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with worse patient-reported outcomes and tender joint counts, according to a study published ...

War veterans with mental health diagnoses more likely to receive prescription opioids for pain

March 6, 2012
Iraq and Afghanistan war veterans with mental health diagnoses, particularly posttraumatic stress disorder, are more likely to receive prescription opioid medications for pain-related conditions, have higher-risk opioid use ...

Recommended for you

Study: No evidence to support link between violent video games and behaviour

January 16, 2018
Researchers at the University of York have found no evidence to support the theory that video games make players more violent.

Study listens in on speech development in early childhood

January 15, 2018
If you've ever listened in on two toddlers at play, you might have wondered how much of their babbling might get lost in translation. A new study from the University of Toronto provides surprising insights into how much children ...

Study suggests people dislike you more for humblebragging than for regular boasting

January 12, 2018
A team of researchers from Harvard University and UNC-Chapel Hill has conducted a study regarding humblebragging—in which a person boasts about an achievement but tries to make it sound less boastful by minimizing it—and ...

Study identifies brain circuit controlling social behavior

January 11, 2018
A new study by researchers at Roche in Basel, Switzerland has identified a key brain region of the neural circuit that controls social behavior. Increasing the activity of this region, called the habenula, led to social problems ...

Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks can speed the trip to dreamland

January 11, 2018
Writing a "to-do" list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a Baylor University study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants ...

Tamper-resistant oxycodone tablets have no impact on overall opioid use

January 11, 2018
The introduction of tamper-resistant opioid tablets does not have an effect on rates of opioid use or harms at a population level, according to a new study led by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.