Step forward in understanding arterial disease

July 16, 2013, University of Lincoln

The next step has been made into isolating the origin of cells linked to the progressive disorder Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

Further strides have been made into isolating the origin of cells that could lead to a greater understanding of what goes into the development of our blood circulating systems.

University of Lincoln Life Sciences academic Dr Rajiv Machado, with colleagues from the University of Cambridge, King's College London and Papworth Hospital, has revealed the recent findings in a research letter to The American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

Dr Machado's main research area is in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) which is a progressive disorder characterised by abnormally (hypertension) in the , the blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the lungs.

Symptoms are shortness of breath, dizziness, swelling (oedema) of the ankles or legs, chest pain and a racing pulse.

In this latest study, researchers investigated genetically identical twins, both of which had the responsible for PAH.

However, only one had the disorder which resulted in both a heart and lung transplant.From this starting block, the team were able to investigate the origin of blood outgrowth endothelial cells (BOEC), which are and good candidates for vascular (re-) generating cell therapy. However, uncertainty remains as to the specific origin of these cells. 

The researchers study of the twins and the mutation they both harboured enabled them to identify a marker to show that those stem cells, the BOECs, were very unlikely to have come from the heart or lungs.

Dr Machado said: "When the circulating BOECs were cultured from the new heart and lungs they still showed the mutation. Hence, they must have been produced in a different organ/s. The importance of this is that scientists are keen to know the origin of these cells both as a proxy for basic science and to provide an understanding of what goes into the development of our blood circulating systems. If we can in one fell swoop remove two organs as being contributory then we are another step closer to knowing where these cells come from."

Explore further: Research findings breathe new life into lung disease

More information: Mark L. Ormiston, Laura Southgate, Carmen Treacy, Joanna Pepke-Zaba, Richard C. Trembath, Rajiv D. Machado, and Nicholas W. Morrell "Assessment of a Pulmonary Origin for Blood Outgrowth Endothelial Cells by Examination of Identical Twins Harboring a BMPR2 Mutation", American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 188, No. 2 (2013), pp. 258-260.

Related Stories

Research findings breathe new life into lung disease

October 24, 2012
It turns out the muscle cells on the outside of blood vessels have been wrongly accused for instigating lung disease. New research shows that while these muscle cells are responsible for constricting or dilating the blood ...

Disruption of cellular signaling identified in pulmonary arterial hypertension

December 27, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Impairment of a key signaling cascade in the pulmonary blood vessels plays an important role in pulmonary arterial hypertension, a Yale study has found. The study appears in the advance online publication ...

Breakthrough could help sufferers of fatal lung disease

October 15, 2012
Pioneering research conducted by the University of Sheffield is paving the way for new treatments which could benefit patients suffering from the fatal lung disease pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).

Why is pulmonary hypertension at high altitude so common and dangerous?

June 27, 2013
Everyone who climbs to high altitude will develop pulmonary hypertension, a temporary constriction of blood vessels that results in increasing strain on the right heart. It is a normal adaptive mechanism but if exaggerated ...

Sleep apnea and pre-eclampsia share a common warning sign

June 27, 2013
Many, but not all, people with sleep apnea develop high blood pressure. In a new study, Yale researchers show those who develop hypertension have many similarities with pregnant woman with pre-eclampsia.

New study may lead to quicker diagnosis, improved treatment for fatal lung disease

July 11, 2011
One-fifth of all patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension suffer with the fatal disease for more than two years before being correctly diagnosed and properly treated, according to a new national study led by researchers ...

Recommended for you

New model suggests cuffless, non-invasive blood pressure monitoring possible using pulse waves

October 16, 2018
A large team of researchers from several institutions in China and the U.S. has developed a model that suggests it should be possible to create a cuffless, non-invasive blood pressure monitor based on measuring pulse waves. ...

Why heart contractions are weaker in those with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

October 16, 2018
When a young athlete suddenly dies of a heart attack, chances are high that they suffer from familial hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Itis the most common genetic heart disease in the US and affects an estimated 1 in 500 ...

Novel genetic study sheds new light on risk of heart attack

October 12, 2018
Loss of a protein that regulates mitochondrial function can greatly increase the risk of myocardial infarction (heart attack), Vanderbilt scientists reported Oct. 3 in the journal eLife.

Researchers say ritual for orthodox Jewish men may offer heart benefits

October 11, 2018
A pilot study led by researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine suggests Jewish men who practice wearing tefillin, which involves the tight wrapping of an arm with leather banding as part of daily ...

Markers of dairy fat consumption linked to lower risk of type two diabetes

October 10, 2018
Higher levels of biomarkers of dairy fat consumption are associated with a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to new research published today in PLOS Medicine. The study, in more than 60,000 adults, was undertaken ...

Seed oils are best for LDL cholesterol

October 9, 2018
If you want to lower your low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, called LDL or, colloquially, "bad cholesterol," the research is clear about one thing: You should exchange saturated fats with unsaturated fat. If you want to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.