New sexual health app to help men last longer

July 19, 2013
New sexual health app to help men last longer

(Medical Xpress)—A new smartphone app that will enable men to last longer in the bedroom by tackling premature ejaculation during sex has been created by QApps, Queen Mary, University of London's app store.

The Last Longer uses a range of simple tips and exercises based on clinical expertise to improve ejaculatory control and reduce performance anxiety.

Professor Peter McOwan, co-founder of QApps and Queen Mary's Vice-Principal for Public Engagement and Student Enterprise, said: "We hope that the app can help men and couples recognise and manage some of the issues surrounding this common and often distressing .

"The interactive app builds directly from clinical work in our medical school, and allows users to conveniently and discreetly chart and review their progress as they work through the various exercises."

Many of the techniques draw upon those pioneered by clinical psychologists in Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (known as CBT) used to combat .

"Surveys have shown that around one in three men are affected by at some point in their lives. But despite help being available men may be embarrassed or reluctant to seek support. Previous research has shown that technology and computer-based interventions can be useful in providing sexual health advice," said Dr Ken Carswell, a clinical psychologist and app co-creator.

"This is the first smartphone app that utilises a range of techniques to help improve ejaculatory control. The app provides a tool box of techniques used by psychologists and sex therapists to help men by setting weekly goals, doing simple exercises to build stamina and monitoring change by recording progress."

The app is designed to be discreet (security passcode protected) and costs £0.69 to download.

Last Longer was the winning app idea of QApps's first university-wide competition at Queen Mary to develop ground-breaking research into innovative smartphone apps.

Explore further: New app uses mathematical theory to match your face to celebrities' faces

More information: itunes.apple.com/gb/app/lastlo … ger/id669006556?mt=8

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alfie_null
not rated yet Jul 22, 2013
Call me insensitive, but this just rubs me the wrong way.

How about a less euphemistic title? And what branch of science does this effort address? Who funded the research? Who's getting the £0.69 per download and what are they doing with it?

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