Novel bacterium linked to cord colitis syndrome

August 8, 2013
Novel bacterium linked to cord colitis syndrome
A novel bacterium is associated with cord colitis syndrome, a complication of umbilical-cord hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, according to a study published in the Aug. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

(HealthDay)—A novel bacterium is associated with cord colitis syndrome, a complication of umbilical-cord hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation, according to a study published in the Aug. 8 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

To examine whether cord colitis syndrome has an infectious origin, Ami S. Bhatt, M.D., Ph.D., from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues performed shotgun DNA sequencing on four endoscopic colon-biopsy specimens from two patients with cord colitis. Human and known microbial sequences were removed and the residual sequences were assembled into a bacterial draft genome.

The researchers found 2.5 million sequencing reads that did not match known organisms and were then assembled into a 7.65-Mb draft genome. The genome was highly homologous to bacteria in the bradyrhizobium genus and named Bradyrhizobium enterica. DNA from B. enterica was present in biopsies from three additional patients with cord colitis but absent from samples from healthy controls and patients with or graft-versus-host disease.

"Although we have not shown that B. enterica is the cause of cord colitis, we have demonstrated the usefulness of sequencing-based technologies for the unbiased identification of previously undiscovered candidate ," Bhatt and colleagues conclude.

Explore further: Colitis in test mice responds to treatment with human umbilical cord-derived mensenchymal cells

More information: Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Colitis in test mice responds to treatment with human umbilical cord-derived mensenchymal cells

April 23, 2012
When laboratory mice were modeled with colitis and treated with human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal cells, the cells homed in on the inflamed colon and effectively ameliorated colitis, reported a study published in a ...

Genomics may help ID organisms in outbreaks of serious infectious disease

April 9, 2013
Researchers have been able to reconstruct the genome sequence of an outbreak strain of Shiga-toxigenic Escherichia coli (STEC) using metagenomics (the direct sequencing of DNA extracted from microbiologically complex samples), ...

Fecal transplant studied for kids with bowel disease

April 17, 2013
(HealthDay)—Fecal transplantation—an innovative enema treatment—may help reduce or eliminate symptoms of ulcerative colitis in most children and young adults, according to a small study.

Possible link between bacterium, colon cancer found

October 17, 2011
For the first time, a specific microorganism has been found to be associated with human colorectal cancer. In two studies published online today in Genome Research, independent research teams have identified Fusobacterium ...

Miss. law requires cord blood from some teen moms

August 2, 2013
If a girl younger than 16 gives birth in Mississippi and won't name the father, a new state law says authorities must collect umbilical cord blood and run DNA tests to prove paternity.

Recommended for you

New study offers insights on genetic indicators of COPD risk

January 16, 2018
Researchers have discovered that genetic variations in the anatomy of the lungs could serve as indicators to help identify people who have low, but stable, lung function early in life, and those who are particularly at risk ...

Previous influenza virus exposures enhance susceptibility in another influenza pandemic

January 16, 2018
While past exposure to influenza A viruses often builds immunity to similar, and sometimes different, strains of the virus, Canadian researchers are calling for more attention to exceptions to that rule.

Don't hold your nose and close your mouth when you sneeze, doctors warn

January 15, 2018
Pinching your nose while clamping your mouth shut to contain a forceful sneeze isn't a good idea, warn doctors in the journal BMJ Case Reports.

New antifungal provides hope in fight against superbugs

January 12, 2018
Microscopic yeast have been wreaking havoc in hospitals around the world—creeping into catheters, ventilator tubes, and IV lines—and causing deadly invasive infection. One culprit species, Candida auris, is resistant ...

Dengue takes low and slow approach to replication

January 11, 2018
A new study reveals how dengue virus manages to reproduce itself in an infected person without triggering the body's normal defenses. Duke researchers report that dengue pulls off this hoax by co-opting a specialized structure ...

Different strains of same bacteria trigger widely varying immune responses

January 11, 2018
Genetic differences between different strains of the same pathogenic bacterial species appear to result in widely varying immune system responses, according to new research published in PLOS Pathogens.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.