1 in 5 boys got HPV shot in first year recommended

August 29, 2013 by Mike Stobbe

A new report offers a first look at how many boys are getting shots designed to protect girls from cervical cancer. Health officials say the number getting vaccinated so far is a good start.

The HPV vaccine has only been recommended for boys for about two years, and rates are usually low at first for new vaccines. But the government report released Thursday shows about 1 in 5 got at least one of the three vaccine doses last year.

The vaccine protects against , which can cause cervical cancer in girls and in both sexes. It was first recommended for girls but hasn't been all that popular. Health officials expect it to be a hard sell for boys, too.

Explore further: Report: Teen HPV vaccination rate still lagging

More information: CDC report: www.cdc.gov/mmwr

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