Risk factor reduction after heart attack—age, race, and gender matter

August 22, 2013
©2013 Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers

Risk factor modification efforts could help reduce the chance of another heart attack and death among the more than 15 million Americans with coronary heart disease. Yet some patients—especially women and minorities—leave the hospital with poorly managed risk factors. An article in Journal of Women's Health, a peer-reviewed publication from Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., publishers, evaluates cardiac risk factors and management strategies by age, sex, and race among 2,369 patients hospitalized for acute myocardial infarction. The article is available free on the Journal of Women's Health website.

About 93% of the patients in the study had at least one of the five evaluated, including hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, current smoking, diabetes, and obesity. Black patients were much more likely to have multiple risk factors than white patients, and black women had the greatest risk factor burden of any of the subgroups. Differences in efforts based on race were also reported.

Erica Leifheit-Limson, PhD and coauthors from Yale School of Public Health and School of Medicine, and Yale-New Haven Hospital (New Haven, CT), St. Luke's Mid America Heart Institute and University of Missouri-Kansas City (Kansas City, MO), and Emory University Rollins School of Public Health and the School of Medicine (Atlanta, GA) report the study results in the article "Prevalence of Traditional Cardiac Risk Factors and Secondary Prevention Among Patients Hospitalized for Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI): Variation by Age, Sex, and Race."

"These findings indicate missed opportunities for both prevention and management of cardiac risk factors, particularly for women and minority patients," says Susan G. Kornstein, MD, Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Women's Health, Executive Director of the Virginia Commonwealth University Institute for Women's Health, Richmond, VA, and President of the Academy of Women's Health.

Explore further: Racial and ethnic disparities in awareness of heart disease risk in women

More information: www.liebertpub.com/jwh

Related Stories

Racial and ethnic disparities in awareness of heart disease risk in women

June 6, 2012
Awareness of the risks of heart disease and signs of a heart attack vary greatly among women of different racial and ethnic groups and ages. New data that clearly identify these disparities in heart health awareness are presented ...

Which women should be screened for high cholesterol?

May 20, 2013
National guidelines recommend that at-risk women be screened for elevated cholesterol levels to reduce their chances of developing cardiovascular disease. But who is 'at risk?' The results of a study by investigators at the ...

Depression risk among women in the military deployed after childbirth

February 12, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—About 16,000 women on active duty in the U.S. military give birth each year. Most return to service after 6 weeks and can be deployed after 4 months. The potential for an increased risk of depression among ...

Should a woman's ovaries be removed during a hysterectomy for noncancerous disease?

July 25, 2013
While ovary removal during hysterectomy protects against future risk of ovarian cancer, the decision to conserve the ovaries and the hormones they produce may have advantages for preventing heart disease, hip fracture, sexual ...

Do insomnia and disrupted sleep during menopause increase a woman's risk of heart disease?

May 9, 2013
Insomnia and other sleep disturbances are common among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and may increase their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence that a combination of altered ...

Why don't more women take a daily aspirin to prevent heart disease?

April 4, 2012
Heart disease is the leading cause of death among women, and evidence-based national guidelines promote the use of daily aspirin for women at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. However, less than half of the women ...

Recommended for you

Could aggressive blood pressure treatments lead to kidney damage?

July 18, 2017
Aggressive combination treatments for high blood pressure that are intended to protect the kidneys may actually be damaging the organs, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine suggests.

Quantifying effectiveness of treatment for irregular heartbeat

July 17, 2017
In a small proof-of-concept study, researchers at Johns Hopkins report a complex mathematical method to measure electrical communications within the heart can successfully predict the effectiveness of catheter ablation, the ...

Concerns over side effects of statins stopping stroke survivors taking medication

July 17, 2017
Negative media coverage of the side effects associated with taking statins, and patients' own experiences of taking the drugs, are among the reasons cited by stroke survivors and their carers for stopping taking potentially ...

Study discovers anticoagulant drugs are being prescribed against safety advice

July 17, 2017
A study by researchers at the University of Birmingham has shown that GPs are prescribing anticoagulants to patients with an irregular heartbeat against official safety advice.

Protein may protect against heart attack

July 14, 2017
DDK3 could be used as a new therapy to stop the build-up of fatty material inside the arteries

Heart study finds faulty link between biomarkers and clinical outcomes

July 14, 2017
Surrogate endpoints (biomarkers), which are routinely used in clinical research to test new drugs, should not be trusted as the ultimate measure to approve new health interventions in cardiovascular medicine, according to ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.