Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center implants one of first MRI-safe devices for pain

August 6, 2013
A patient undergoes a MRI scan at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Worldwide, MRIs are performed once per second, every second of the day. A new MRI-safe spinal cord stimulator means patients with chronic pain now have new options in the treatment of their condition. Credit: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

Neurosurgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are among the first in the United States to successfully implant an MRI-safe spinal cord stimulator to help patients suffering from chronic back or limb pain.

Neurosurgeons Dr. Ali Rezai and Dr. Milind Deogaonkar performed the surgery Aug. 5 to help relieve intense foot pain due to a that 78-year-old John Garvin of Worthington, Ohio, has suffered for more than 20 years. Garvin is among the estimated 100 million Americans living with chronic pain, according to the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies

For some patients, such as Garvin, relief comes only through a stimulator device implanted near the spine to help block to the brain. These stimulators have been used for years, but in the past, once they were implanted, patients could no longer receive Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) screenings. That worried Garvin, who has needed MRI scans in the past.

The Food and Drug Administration recently approved the RestoreSensor SureScan MRI neurostimulation system developed by Medtronic Inc., for use in the treatment of chronic, intractable back or limb pain for conditionally safe full-body MRI scans, under specific conditions.

"The ability to safely perform MRI scans after implant is an important advance and a major benefit for our patients," said Rezai, director of the Center for Neuromodulation and Functional Neurosurgery at Ohio State's Wexner Medical Center. "Now, with this new capability, we're able to perform MRI scans of the body for our patients who have implants and that provides a better way for patients to be managed over time."

Doctors implant one of the first MRI-safe spinal stimulators in the United States, Aug. 5th, 2013 at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center. Spinal stimulators are used to treat chronic pain in the back and limbs and, until now, patients who got them could no longer get MRIs. Credit: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

MRI scans have become a diagnostic standard of care, allowing physicians to detect a wide range of health conditions by viewing highly detailed images using strong magnetic fields and radio frequency pulses to create images of structures in the body. Worldwide, it's estimated that 60 million MRI procedures are performed each year, including an estimated 32 million in the United States,

"MRI examinations are necessary and routinely performed for diagnosis and clinical care. It's very likely that a patient with chronic pain, spinal disease, neurological and orthopedic disorders will require an MRI scan," said Rezai, who is president of both the North American Neuromodulation Society and the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. "These spinal cord stimulators can help patients who suffer from extreme back, leg and extremity pain, especially those patients who have failed all previous medications and other approaches to get improvements in their pain and quality of life and functioning.

Ohio State neurologist Dr. John Kissel, a neuromuscular specialist, who has treated Garvin for almost two decades, said he suggested Garvin for the surgery because multiple medications were no longer helping to relieve foot and leg pain caused by his diabetic neuropathy.

"The stimulator will improve his life by reducing his pain, increasing his ability to do routine activities, and hopefully lowering his need for medications," Kissel said.

Garvin is looking forward to spending pain-free time playing with his grandchildren, walking his dog and attending Ohio State football games.

The video will load shortly
Neurosurgeons at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are among the first in the United States to successfully implant an MRI-safe spinal cord stimulator to help patients suffering from chronic back or limb pain. Neurosurgeons Dr. Ali Rezai and Dr. Milind Deogaonkar performed the surgery August 5, 2013 to help relieve intense foot pain due to a peripheral neuropathy in a 78-year-old patient. Credit: The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center

"This is a no brainer," Garvin said. "I wouldn't continue on with this pain for 10 minutes longer than I'd have to before I could have it put in. I know I'll feel stronger because I'll be able to do more things without ."

Until now, patients with stimulators couldn't receive full-body MRI scans due to concerns about the system being affected by the large magnetic fields and radio frequency energy involved in an MRI scan. The new device is designed with enhancements to reduce or eliminate the hazards produced by the MRI. The system includes a proprietary feature which sets the neurostimulator to an appropriate mode for the MRI environment, enabling radiology staff to easily and conveniently confirm a patient's implantable system is safe for MRI scanning.

"At Ohio State, we're happy to be one of the first in the country to be able to implant this device that allows our to receive MRI scans safely," Rezai said

Explore further: Surgery consultation common after MRI of the spine

Related Stories

Surgery consultation common after MRI of the spine

January 2, 2013
(HealthDay)—Almost half of patients whose primary care physicians recommend a lumbosacral or cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan go on to receive a surgical consultation, but few end up undergoing spinal ...

MRI identifies compression fractures before cementing

June 5, 2013
(HealthDay)—In patients with suspected vertebral compression fractures, the addition of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) reduces the rate of misdiagnosis of acute lesions and hidden lesions before percutaneous cement augmentation ...

MRI screening may help identify spinal infections from contaminated drug injections

June 18, 2013
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at the site of injection of a contaminated lot of a steroid drug to treat symptoms such as back pain resulted in earlier identification of patients with probable or confirmed fungal spinal ...

Spine MRIs often show harmless 'defects,' study finds

March 13, 2013
(HealthDay)—Even though expensive MRIs produce very detailed images for assessing back pain, they may not be very good at evaluating results after treatment, research suggests.

Treatment for hip conditions should not rest solely on MRI scans

February 11, 2012
When it comes to treating people with hip pain, physicians should not replace clinical observation with the use of magnetic resonance images (MRI), according to research being presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society ...

Recommended for you

Zebrafish study reveals clues to healing spinal cord injuries

July 25, 2017
Fresh insights into how zebrafish repair their nerve connections could hold clues to new therapies for people with spinal cord injuries.

Brain stimulation may improve cognitive performance in people with schizophrenia

July 24, 2017
Brain stimulation could be used to treat cognitive deficits frequently associated with schizophrenia, according to a new study from King's College London.

New map may lead to drug development for complex brain disorders, researcher says

July 24, 2017
Just as parents are not the root of all their children's problems, a single gene mutation can't be blamed for complex brain disorders like autism, according to a Keck School of Medicine of USC neuroscientist.

Bird songs provide insight into how developing brain forms memories

July 24, 2017
Researchers at the University of Chicago have demonstrated, for the first time, that a key protein complex in the brain is linked to the ability of young animals to learn behavioral patterns from adults.

Research identifies new brain death pathway in Alzheimer's disease

July 24, 2017
Alzheimer's disease tragically ravages the brains, memories and ultimately, personalities of its victims. Now affecting 5 million Americans, Alzheimer's disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S., and a cure ...

Illuminating neural pathways in the living brain

July 24, 2017
Using light alone, scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Neurobiology in Martinsried are now able to reveal pairs or chains of functionally connected neurons under the microscope. The new optogenetic method, named Optobow, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.