Study: Gold star nutrition ratings appears to work

Study: Gold star nutrition ratings appears to work
Hannaford stores feature the company's Guiding Stars rating system, as shown on a cereal price tag in a South Portland, Maine, store on Wednesday, Oct. 23, 2013. A new study by researchers with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration and the University of Florida suggest that the rating system steers shoppers toward healthier choices in grocery stores. (AP Photo/Clarke Canfield)

A new study suggests that a nutritional rating system using gold stars affixed to price labels on grocery store shelves may be helping consumers buy healthier food.

The study by researchers from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the Food and Drug Administration and the University of Florida suggests that the star system in Maine-based Hannaford stores steered shoppers toward more nutritious , potentially providing another tool to educate consumers and battle obesity.

It's the most rigorous scientific studying focusing on Guiding Stars, which was instituted in 2006 in Hannaford stores and is now licensed for use in more than 1,800 stores in the U.S. and Canada.

It's one of several nutritional rating systems. Food and Drug Administration officials have proposed front-of-package labels but those are still in the works.


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Citation: Study: Gold star nutrition ratings appears to work (2013, October 24) retrieved 17 September 2021 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2013-10-gold-star-nutrition.html
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