USPSTF updates recommendations on youth blood pressure screening

October 7, 2013, American College of Physicians

The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) found insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine screening for primary hypertension in asymptomatic children and adolescents. Hypertension in children and adolescents has increased over the past several decades, which may be attributable to the climb in childhood overweight and obesity rates.

An estimated 11 percent of obese children in the United States suffer from , putting them at increased risk for hypertension in adulthood.

One rationale for screening young patients is that it could lead to interventions that reduce blood pressure and reduce the risk for cardiovascular events and death in adulthood. However, there might also be harms associated with early treatment. A review of evidence published since the Task Force's 2003 recommendation found insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about the balance of the benefits and harms of screening.

The full recommendation statement is being published in Annals of Internal Medicine and also in Pediatrics.

Explore further: USPSTF: evidence lacking for ankle brachial index screening

Related Stories

USPSTF: evidence lacking for ankle brachial index screening

September 3, 2013
(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) has found that there is currently insufficient evidence to weigh the benefits and harms of use of the ankle-brachial index (ABI) for screening for peripheral ...

Experts dispute value of checking kids' blood pressure

February 25, 2013
(HealthDay)—Despite a worrisome increase in obese and hypertensive children and teens, not enough evidence exists to justify routinely screening young people for high blood pressure, a new report says.

Task Force recommends that physicians counsel youth against tobacco use

August 26, 2013
The United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that primary care clinicians provide interventions, including education or brief counseling, to prevent initiation of tobacco use in school-aged children ...

USPSTF: Offer breast CA risk-reducing Rx to high-risk patients

September 24, 2013
(HealthDay)—The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommends that women at increased risk of breast cancer be prescribed tamoxifen or raloxifene for risk reduction, according to a final Recommendation Statement ...

Primary care docs shouldn't screen all patients for oral cancer: experts

April 11, 2013
(HealthDay)—Not enough evidence exists to recommend that primary care physicians perform oral cancer screenings on adult patients who have no signs or symptoms of the condition, an expert panel says.

Childhood obesity may quadruple high blood pressure risk in adulthood

September 12, 2013
Obese children quadruple their risk and overweight children double their risk of developing high blood pressure in adulthood, according to a study presented at the American Heart Association High Blood Pressure Research Scientific ...

Recommended for you

Phone-addicted teens are unhappy, study finds

January 22, 2018
Happiness is not a warm phone, according to a new study exploring the link between adolescent life satisfaction and screen time. Teens whose eyes are habitually glued to their smartphones are markedly unhappier, said study ...

Baby brains help infants figure it out before they try it out

January 17, 2018
Babies often amaze their parents when they seemingly learn new skills overnight—how to walk, for example. But their brains were probably prepping for those tasks long before their first steps occurred, according to researchers.

NeuroNext biomarker study explores natural history of infantile-onset SMA

January 9, 2018
Research led by The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center to define the natural history of infantile-onset spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been "critical" to accelerate the development of effective therapies and hasten ...

No link between childhood lead levels, later criminality

December 27, 2017
(HealthDay)— Exposure to higher levels of lead during early childhood can affect neurological development—but does that mean affected kids are doomed to delinquency?

Early puberty in girls may take mental health toll

December 26, 2017
(HealthDay)—A girl who gets her first menstrual period early in life—possibly as young as 7—has a greater risk for developing depression and antisocial behaviors that last at least into her 20s, a new study suggests.

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase

December 21, 2017
With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.