A mouse model to evaluate potential age-promoting compounds

December 16, 2013

While there are well-established mouse models to identify cancer-causing agents, similar models are not available to readily test and identify age-promoting agents. Recently, a mouse strain (p16LUC mice) was developed that can be used to evaluate the transcription of p16INK4, which is increasingly expressed during aging and in age-associated diseases.

In this issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, Norman Sharpless and colleagues at the University of North Carolina evaluated potential age-promoting compounds, including arsenic, a high-fat diet, UV light, and in p16LUC mice.

The authors found that a high fat diet did not accelerate p16INK4 expression, but both UV light exposure and cigarette smoke exposure dramatically increased p16INK4 expression compared to controls that had not been exposed to these age-promoting compounds.

This study demonstrates that p16LUC mice are an appropriate model system for evaluating potential age-promoting compounds.

Explore further: Cigarette smoke impacts genes linked to health of heart and lungs

More information: p16INK4a reporter mice reveal age-promoting effects of environmental toxicants, J Clin Invest. DOI: 10.1172/JCI70960

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