Video: New vaccine to protect babies from whooping cough

January 15, 2014 by David Hover

Whooping cough, also known as pertussis, is a bacterial infection that can be fatal. Now, a new nasal vaccination aimed at infants aims to address an unmet medical need against this disease.

In Europe, (Pertussis) is in the increase, with more than 20.000 cases reported annually. Often infants fall victim to the disease, where it can be life-threatening. Possible complications include pneumonia, and collapsed lungs, leading to death in one in 200.

There is a vaccine on the market, but a newborn's immune system is too immature to respond to it. Therefore scientists at the Institute Pasteur in Lille, France have developed a new vaccine that the babies' immune system can deal with: it is administered intranasally to reproduce the natural conditions of infection as closely as possible. The new substance is currently undergoing clinical trials and has passed the first phase of testing on human adults successfully. The results were published on the last issue of the peer-reviewed journal Plos One.

The video will load shortly

Read more: Camille Locht: An innovative solution to infant whooping cough

Explore further: Successful test in humans of a nasal vaccine against pertussis

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Researchers identify source of opioids' side effects

January 17, 2017

A commercially available drug may help drastically reduce two side effects of opioid painkillers—a growing tolerance and a paradoxical increased sensitivity to pain—without affecting the drugs' ability to reduce pain, ...

CVS generic competitor to EpiPen, sold at a 6th the price

January 12, 2017

CVS is now selling a rival, generic version of Mylan's EpiPen at about a sixth of its price, just months after the maker of the life-saving allergy treatment was eviscerated before Congress because of its soaring cost to ...

Many misuse OTC sleep aids: survey

December 29, 2016

(HealthDay)—People struggling with insomnia often turn to non-prescription sleep remedies that may be habit-forming and are only intended for short-term use, according to a new Consumer Reports survey.

The pill won't kill your sexual desire, researchers say

December 15, 2016

Taking the pill doesn't lower your sexual desire, contrary to popular belief, according to research published in the Journal of Sexual Medicine. The authors of the research, from the University of Kentucky and Indiana University ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.