Review: Coffee in pregnancy tied to childhood leukemia risk

February 7, 2014
Review: coffee in pregnancy tied to childhood leukemia risk

(HealthDay)—Maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of childhood acute leukemia (AL), according to a meta-analysis published in the February issue of the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Jian Cheng, from Anhui Medical University in China, and colleagues conducted a systematic literature review to examine the correlation between maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy and AL, including (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Included studies reported the odds ratios for childhood AL with respect to maternal coffee drinking in pregnancy.

Based on meta-analysis of seven studies, the researchers found that the combined odds ratio relating to the relationship of maternal coffee consumption during pregnancy and childhood AL was 1.22 for ever drinkers; 1.16 for low to moderate-level drinkers; and 1.72 for high-level drinkers, compared with non/lowest drinkers. Maternal coffee consumption (high-level drinkers versus non/lowest drinkers) was statistically significantly associated with childhood ALL and AML (odds ratios, 1.65 and 1.58, respectively). There was a linear dose-response relationship for coffee consumption and childhood AL (P for nonlinearity = 0.68), including childhood ALL and AML.

"The findings of the meta-analysis suggest that maternal during pregnancy may increase the risk of childhood AL," the authors write.

Explore further: Sleep-disordered breathing may worsen pregnancy outcomes

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