Fertility concerns common for young women with breast CA

February 27, 2014
Fertility concerns common for young women with breast CA
Fertility concerns are common among young women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, although only a minority pursue fertility preservation strategies, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

(HealthDay)—Fertility concerns are common among young women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, although only a minority pursue fertility preservation strategies, according to a study published online Feb. 24 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Kathryn J. Ruddy, M.D., M.P.H., from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues surveyed women (≤40 years) with newly diagnosed early-stage breast cancer regarding fertility concerns. Sociodemographic, medical, and treatment data were investigated in a baseline survey, while a modified Fertility Issues Survey was used to examine fertility concern and preservation items.

The researchers found that 68 percent of the 620 eligible respondents (median age, 37 years) discussed with their physicians before therapy initiation. Fifty-one percent of women expressed concern about becoming infertile after treatment. Due to fertility concerns, 1 percent of women chose not to receive chemotherapy and 2 percent selected one chemotherapy regimen over another. Similarly, 1 percent of women considered not receiving ; 3 percent opted not to receive endocrine therapy; and 11 percent considered receiving endocrine therapy for less than five years due to concerns about fertility. Fertility preservation strategies were used by 10 percent of women. Younger age, nonwhite race, not having children, and receipt of chemotherapy correlated with greater concern about fertility.

"Many young women with newly diagnosed have concerns about fertility, and for some, these substantially affect their treatment decisions," the authors write.

Explore further: Breast cancer patients lack adequate fertility preservation advice

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Breast cancer patients lack adequate fertility preservation advice

November 7, 2011
(Medical Xpress) -- Women may not receive adequate information on fertility preservation before breast cancer treatment, according to research presented at the National Cancer Research Institute (NCRI) Cancer Conference in ...

Few young women with cancer take steps to preserve fertility during treatments

March 26, 2012
A new study has found that very few young women with cancer take steps to preserve their fertility while undergoing cancer therapy. Also, certain groups of young women are more likely to do so than others. Published early ...

Future issues important for fertility preservation decisions

September 11, 2013
(HealthDay)—Future decisions and issues must be considered by cancer patients in their fertility preservation decision-making process, according to a clinical opinion piece published in the August issue of the American ...

Having a baby after fertility issues improves couples chances of staying together

January 30, 2014
New reseach reveals that women who have a child after experiencing fertility problems are more likely to remain with their partner following infertility evaluations. Findings in Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica, ...

Saving fertility not priority at most cancer centers

December 19, 2013
Infertility is consistently listed as one of the most distressing long-term side effects of cancer treatment for adolescents and young adults. Yet the leading National Cancer Institute-designated comprehensive cancer centers—which ...

Radiation oncologists are discussing infertility risks with young cancer patients

March 8, 2012
More than 80 percent of radiation oncologists discuss the impact of cancer treatments on fertility with their patients of childbearing age, which can lead to improved quality of life for young cancer patients who are living ...

Recommended for you

CAR-T immunotherapy may help blood cancer patients who don't respond to standard treatments

October 20, 2017
Siteman Cancer Center at Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is one of the first centers nationwide to offer a new immunotherapy that targets certain blood cancers. Newly approved ...

Researchers pinpoint causes for spike in breast cancer genetic testing

October 20, 2017
A sharp rise in the number of women seeking BRCA genetic testing to evaluate their risk of developing breast cancer was driven by multiple factors, including celebrity endorsement, according to researchers at the University ...

Study shows how nerves drive prostate cancer

October 19, 2017
In a study in today's issue of Science, researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, part of Montefiore Medicine, report that certain nerves sustain prostate cancer growth by triggering a switch that causes tumor vessels ...

Gene circuit switches on inside cancer cells, triggers immune attack

October 19, 2017
Researchers at MIT have developed a synthetic gene circuit that triggers the body's immune system to attack cancers when it detects signs of the disease.

One to 10 mutations are needed to drive cancer, scientists find

October 19, 2017
For the first time, scientists have provided unbiased estimates of the number of mutations needed for cancers to develop, in a study of more than 7,500 tumours across 29 cancer types. Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger ...

Researchers target undruggable cancers

October 19, 2017
A new approach to targeting key cancer-linked proteins, thought to be 'undruggable," has been discovered through an alliance between industry and academia.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.