Rules to limit marketing unhealthy food in schools

February 25, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

(AP)—Moving beyond the lunch line, new rules expected to be proposed by the White House and the Agriculture Department would limit marketing of unhealthy foods in schools.

The rules would phase out the advertising of and junk foods around campuses and ensure that other promotions in schools are in line with health standards that apply to school foods.

School scoreboards, vending machines, cups, posters and menu boards could all be subject to the new rules.

The proposed rules are scheduled to be announced Tuesday as a part of first lady Michelle Obama's Let's Move initiative to combat child obesity. The initiative is celebrating its fourth anniversary this week.

Mrs. Obama and Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack were to announce the new rules at a White House event.

Explore further: New rules aim to get rid of junk foods in schools

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