Rice recalled after skin reactions in children

February 10, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

The Food and Drug Administration is warning against eating Uncle Ben's rice products served at schools, restaurants, hospitals and other food service institutions after children in three states had skin reactions and other symptoms that were linked to the rice.

Uncle Ben's products in have not been recalled.

Mars Foodservices of Greenville, Miss., is recalling 5- and 25-pound bags of the rice.

The FDA said that it found out on Feb. 7 that 34 students and four teachers in Katy, Texas, had experienced burning, itching rashes, headaches and nausea for 30 to 90 minutes after eating the rice. The symptoms eventually went away.

The FDA said 25 students in Illinois had reported a similar reaction in December. Another incident was reported in North Dakota in October.

Explore further: US: Rice is safe, despite small levels of arsenic

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