Rice recalled after skin reactions in children

February 10, 2014 by Mary Clare Jalonick

The Food and Drug Administration is warning against eating Uncle Ben's rice products served at schools, restaurants, hospitals and other food service institutions after children in three states had skin reactions and other symptoms that were linked to the rice.

Uncle Ben's products in have not been recalled.

Mars Foodservices of Greenville, Miss., is recalling 5- and 25-pound bags of the rice.

The FDA said that it found out on Feb. 7 that 34 students and four teachers in Katy, Texas, had experienced burning, itching rashes, headaches and nausea for 30 to 90 minutes after eating the rice. The symptoms eventually went away.

The FDA said 25 students in Illinois had reported a similar reaction in December. Another incident was reported in North Dakota in October.

Explore further: US: Rice is safe, despite small levels of arsenic

Related Stories

US: Rice is safe, despite small levels of arsenic

September 6, 2013
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration says consumers should not worry too much about levels of arsenic in rice—but should vary their diets just in case.

Denmark warns against rice for children

May 15, 2013
Denmark's Veterinary and Food Administration said Wednesday that parents should stop giving their children rice cakes and rice milk, saying the products contained unacceptable levels of inorganic arsenic.

Over 350 sick in Japan after eating pesticide-tainted food

January 7, 2014
More than 350 people across Japan have fallen ill after eating pesticide-contaminated frozen food produced by the nation's largest seafood firm, national broadcaster NHK said Tuesday.

Tuna linked to salmonella outbreak in 20 states

April 14, 2012
(AP) -- A yellowfin tuna product used to make dishes like sushi and sashimi sold at restaurants and grocery stores has been linked with an outbreak of salmonella that has sickened more than 100 people in 20 states and the ...

Dietitian weighs in on controversy about arsenic in food: Eating a balanced diet will limit exposure to element

November 15, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Recent reports about arsenic in rice have sparked a great deal of panic among U.S. consumers. However, the average American who eats a variety of whole grains doesn't need to stress about arsenic, according ...

Recommended for you

Blowing smoke? E-cigarettes might help smokers quit

July 26, 2017
People who used e-cigarettes were more likely to kick the habit than those who didn't, a new study found.

Brain disease seen in most football players in large report

July 25, 2017
Research on 202 former football players found evidence of a brain disease linked to repeated head blows in nearly all of them, from athletes in the National Football League, college and even high school.

Safety of medical devices not often evaluated by sex, age, or race

July 25, 2017
Researchers at Yale and the University of California-San Francisco have found that few medical devices are analyzed to consider the influence of their users' sex, age, or race on safety and effectiveness.

Why you should consider more than looks when choosing a fitness tracker

July 25, 2017
A UNSW study of five popular physical activity monitors, including Fitbit and Jawbone models, has found their accuracy differs with the speed of activity, and where they are worn.

Dog walking could be key to ensuring activity in later life

July 24, 2017
A new study has shown that regularly walking a dog boosts levels of physical activity in older people, especially during the winter.

Study finds 275,000 calls to poison control centers for dietary supplement exposures from 2000 through 2012

July 24, 2017
U.S. Poison Control Centers receive a call every 24 minutes, on average, regarding dietary supplement exposures, according to a new study from the Center for Injury Research and Policy and the Central Ohio Poison Center, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.