Research shows smoking harms your chances of recovering from fractures

March 12, 2014, University of Lincoln

Bone healing cells in non-smokers are of a better quality, more active and quicker at dividing than those of smokers, according to new research.

The study, carried out by United Lincolnshire Hospitals NHS Trust (ULHT) and the University of Lincoln, UK, involved gathering 50 fracture patients who volunteered to allow blood from the area of the fracture to be analysed.

The blood was studied in the laboratory at the University of Lincoln to identify the differences in the quantity and quality of stem cells and molecules that are involved in bone regeneration following fracture.

Trauma and Orthopaedic Consultant at Lincoln County Hospital, Professor Mohammad Maqsood, who had previously completed the first stages of research into how smoking affects the of fractures at cellular and , said: "We set up the research looking at the factors which affect the healing process of fractures in 2007, which involved collecting the blood from consenting patients, both smokers and non-smokers, who have suffered tibial fractures and had been admitted to Lincoln County Hospital for surgery.

"We also set up a 'smoking machine' which simulates smoking 20 cigarettes per day to study the effects of smoking on the blood in a controlled environment."

The team also included Director of Research and Development at ULHT and Consultant Breast Surgeon, Professor Oleg Eremin; Senior Lecturer, Dr Mohamed El-Sheemy, and PhD researcher Andrew Sloan from the University of Lincoln, and staff from the orthopaedic department at Lincoln County Hospital.

Andrew said: "I was particularly interested in how stem cells can be extracted and isolated from human fracture tissue. I felt a real sense of achievement when we were able to do this, as only one group in the world had written about this methodology previously. After growing and harvesting the from the tissue, we were able to closely analyse and monitor how cigarette smoking had a detrimental impact on stem cell growth and development, giving rise to abnormal bone repair. We also showed how the molecules that mediate certain cellular processes were being hampered by the toxic effects of the tobacco smoke and its constituent components."

The results revealed that the bone healing cells in non-smokers were of a superior quality, more active and quicker at dividing than those of smokers, which contributes to a faster .

The team presented the findings of this study across Britain and at conferences in Finland, France, Switzerland and the Czech Republic.

The next steps of the project will involve looking at how the adverse effect of at cellular and molecular level can be reversed.

Explore further: Smoking affects fracture healing

Related Stories

Smoking affects fracture healing

March 22, 2013
In a new study presented today at the 2013 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS), researchers reviewed existing literature on smoking and the healing of fractures involving long bones (bones ...

Smoking affects the heart, lungs ... and bones

January 3, 2014
As the new year begins, many people will resolve to quit smoking. Although most smokers realize the habit isn't good for their hearts and lungs, Washington University orthopaedic surgeons remind them that lung and heart health ...

How binge drinking impairs bone healing

October 6, 2013
Physicians have long observed that binge drinking can significantly impair the healing process following a bone fracture.

Differences in bone healing in mice may hold answers to bone healing for seniors

March 21, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—By studying the underlying differences in gene expression during healing after a bone break in young versus aged mice, Jaimo Ahn, MD, PhD, assistant professor of Orthopaedic Surgery at the Perelman School ...

Smokers' brains biased against negative images of smoking

March 10, 2014
What if the use of a product influenced your perception of it, making you even more susceptible to its positive aspects and altering your understanding of its drawbacks? This is precisely what happens with cigarettes in chronic ...

New MRI can 'see through' metal screws to follow patients after hip fracture surgery

March 11, 2014
People who sustain the most common type of hip fracture, known as a femoral neck fracture, are at increased risk of complications. A special type of MRI developed at Hospital for Special Surgery in collaboration with GE Healthcare ...

Recommended for you

Women run faster after taking newly developed supplement, study finds

January 19, 2018
A new study found that women who took a specially prepared blend of minerals and nutrients for a month saw their 3-mile run times drop by almost a minute.

Americans are getting more sleep

January 19, 2018
Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. According to data from 181,335 respondents aged 15 and older who participated ...

Wine is good for you—to a point

January 18, 2018
The Mediterranean diet has become synonymous with healthy eating, but there's one thing in it that stands out: It's cool to drink wine.

Sleep better, lose weight?

January 17, 2018
(HealthDay)—Sleeplessness could cost you when it's time to stand on your bathroom scale, a new British study suggests.

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.