TV viewing time linked to sleep duration in children

March 12, 2014
TV viewing time linked to sleep duration in children

(HealthDay)—For children, television viewing time is inversely associated with sleep duration, according to a study published online March 10 in JAMA Pediatrics.

Marcella Marinelli, Ph.D., from the Center for Research in Environmental Epidemiology in Barcelona, Spain, and colleagues examined the correlation between hours of and sleep duration in a cohort of 1,713 . Parent-reported television viewing duration and sleep duration were measured in hours per day for children from Menorca (at ages 6 and 9 years) and Sabadell and Valencia (at ages 2 and 4 years).

The researchers found that children with longer periods of television viewing at baseline (≥1.5 hours per day) had shorter sleep duration in cross-sectional analyses. In longitudinal analyses, a reduction in sleep duration at follow-up was seen for children with reported increases in television viewing duration over time (from <1.5 hours to ≥1.5 hours per day). When examining television viewing as a continuous variable, results were similar, with decreasing sleeping duration seen at follow-up visits for each one-hour per day increase in viewing. Similar associations were observed on assessment of television viewing during weekends, and after adjustment for potential intermediate factors (including child executive function and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms) and confounders (including child physical activity, parental mental health status, and maternal IQ and marital status).

"Children spending longer periods watching television had shorter sleep duration," the authors write. "Changes in television viewing duration were inversely associated with changes in in longitudinal analysis."

Explore further: Children's sleep patterns tracked for the first time by researchers

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Children's sleep patterns tracked for the first time by researchers

December 17, 2013
Sleep patterns of children and how many hours may be optimal for their health and wellbeing has been tracked and recorded for the first time by researchers at the Institute.

Inadequate sleep predicts risk of heart disease, diabetes in obese adolescents

March 6, 2014
Obese adolescents not getting enough sleep? A study in today's The Journal of Pediatrics, shows they could be increasing their risk for developing diabetes, heart disease and stroke.

Improved sleep may improve exercise duration

August 23, 2013
(HealthDay)—The length of an individual's sleep appears to influence their participation level in exercise the next day, according to a small study published in the August issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Tots who sleep less have more behavior problems, says study

July 10, 2013
Four-year-olds with shorter than average sleep times have increased rates of "externalizing" behavior problems, reports a study in the July Journal of Developmental & Behavioral Pediatrics, the official journal of the Society ...

Shorter sleep duration and poorer sleep quality linked to Alzheimer's disease biomarker

October 21, 2013
Poor sleep quality may impact Alzheimer's disease onset and progression. This is according to a new study led by researchers at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health who examined the association between sleep ...

Do insomnia and disrupted sleep during menopause increase a woman's risk of heart disease?

May 9, 2013
Insomnia and other sleep disturbances are common among perimenopausal and postmenopausal women and may increase their risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Evidence that a combination of altered ...

Recommended for you

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

Starting school young can put child wellbeing at risk

June 22, 2017
New research has shown that the youngest pupils in each school year group could be at risk of worse mental health than their older classmates.

Fidget spinners are the latest toy craze, but the medical benefits are unclear

June 21, 2017
Last week, German customs agents in Frankfurt Airport seized 35 metric tons of an imported plastic device, destroying the shipment for public safety purposes before it could infiltrate the country's marketplaces.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.