Excellent long-term outcomes seen following esophagectomy

April 2, 2014
Excellent long-term outcomes seen following esophagectomy

(HealthDay)—Patients undergoing esophagectomy with gastric pull-up report excellent long-term nutritional status, quality of life, and satisfaction with eating, according to research published in the March issue of The Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery.

Christina L. Greene, M.D., from the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, and colleagues interviewed 40 patients (, 75 years; median follow-up, 12 years) who had undergone with gastric pull-up before 2003 regarding their alimentary function.

The researchers found that 88 percent of the patients had no dysphagia; 90 percent were able to eat three or more meals/day; and 93 percent finished half or more of a typical meal. Patients had a mean alimentary comfort rating of 9 out of 10. One-third of patients had dumping, diarrhea at least three times/day, or regurgitation. Aspiration episodes requiring hospitalization occurred in six patients (15 percent). Post-surgery, the median weight loss was 26 lbs, and the current median body mass index was 25 kg/m², with only two underweight. Within the cohort, the median Gastrointestinal Quality of Life score was 2.9 out of 4, while RAND scores were at the population mean for the physical function category and above the normal mean in the other seven categories.

"Pessimism regarding the long-term ability to enjoy a meal and live with a good quality of life after esophagectomy is unwarranted," the authors write.

One author reports financial ties to the pharmaceutical and medical industries.

Explore further: Patients enjoy good quality of life ten years after esophagectomy and gastric pull-up

More information: Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Related Stories

Patients enjoy good quality of life ten years after esophagectomy and gastric pull-up

March 19, 2014
Long-term survivors after esophagectomy with gastric pull-up can enjoy a satisfying meal and good quality of life according to a new study from a team of researchers at the University of Southern California Keck School of ...

Gastric bypass surgery may diminish knee pain in obese patients

March 14, 2014
There is a known link between elevated body mass index (BMI) and symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA). While patients who have undergone gastric bypass surgery (GBS)—a procedure that closes off much of the stomach and causes ...

Chronic hyperglycemia tied to worse surgical outcomes

March 16, 2014
(HealthDay)—Chronic hyperglycemia (A1C >8 percent) is associated with poor surgical outcomes, as measured by an increased hospital length of stay (LOS), according to a study published in the March issue of Diabetes Care.

Longer LOS for new heart failure in medicaid patients

March 4, 2014
(HealthDay)—Medicaid patients and patients with more comorbidities have a longer length of stay (LOS) for incident heart failure, compared to other hospitalized cases, according to a study published in the January/February ...

Substantial weight loss for severely obese individuals three years after bariatric surgery

November 4, 2013
In 3-year follow-up after bariatric surgery, substantial weight loss was observed among individuals who were severely obese, with most of the change occurring during the first year; however, there was variability in the amount ...

Cause for exaggerated insulin response in subset of bariatric surgery patients identified

March 27, 2014
University of Cincinnati (UC) researchers have discovered that altered islet cell function and reduced insulin clearance contribute to excessive post-meal insulin response in patients experiencing low blood sugar symptoms ...

Recommended for you

World's first child hand transplant a 'success'

July 19, 2017
The first child in the world to undergo a double hand transplant is now able to write, feed and dress himself, doctors said Tuesday, declaring the ground-breaking operation a success after 18 months.

Knee surgery—have we been doing it wrong?

July 18, 2017
A team of University at Buffalo medical doctors have published a study that challenges a surgical practice used for decades during arthroscopic knee surgery.

New tools help surgeons find liver tumors, not nick blood vessels

July 17, 2017
The liver is a particularly squishy, slippery organ, prone to shifting both deadly tumors and life-preserving blood vessels by inches between the time they're discovered on a CT scan and when the patient is lying on an operating ...

Researchers discover indicator of lung transplant rejection

July 13, 2017
Research by scientists at Dignity Health St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center's Norton Thoracic Institute was published in the July 12, 2017 issue of Science Translational Medicine titled "Zbtb7a induction in alveolar ...

New device could make closing surgical incisions a cinch

July 7, 2017
Like many surgeons, Dr. Jason Spector is often faced with the challenge of securely closing the abdominal wall without injuring the intestines. If the process goes awry, there can be serious consequences for patients, including ...

Success with first 20 patients undergoing minimally invasive pancreatic transplant surgery

June 29, 2017
Surgeons at Johns Hopkins Medicine report that their first series of a minimally invasive procedure to treat chronic pancreas disease, known as severe pancreatitis, resulted in shorter hospital stays, less need for opioids ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.