FDA OKs Merck tablet to reduce grass allergies

April 15, 2014 by The Associated Press

Merck & Co. says the Food and Drug Administration has approved its new tablet for grass allergies, Grastek, for patients five to 65 years old.

Meant as an alternative to weekly allergy shots, the tablet dissolves under the tongue. Taken daily for a few years, it gradually reduces sensitivity to common grasses, instead of temporarily relieving symptoms including sneezing, runny nose, and itchy, watery eyes.

Merck, based in Whitehouse Station, N.J., will market the in North America. Its partner, ALK-Abello, sells it in Europe as Grazas.

Merck said Grastek will be available in U.S. pharmacies in late April. However, it's best to start taking it three months before grass pollen season begins.

The drug can cause severe allergic reactions and shouldn't be used by patients with severe asthma.

Explore further: Canada approves Merck grass allergy immunotherapy

Related Stories

Canada approves Merck grass allergy immunotherapy

February 3, 2014
Merck & Co. says it's won its first approval for its new immunotherapy tablet for grass allergies, from regulators in Canada.

Merck says FDA reviewing its ragweed allergy therapy

May 8, 2013
Drugmaker Merck & Co. says the Food and Drug Administration is reviewing its second application to sell a new type of allergy treatment meant to gradually reduce allergic reactions over time, rather than just relieving sneezing, ...

Merck: FDA reviewing tablet to eliminate allergy

March 27, 2013
Drugmaker Merck & Co. says federal regulators are reviewing its application to sell a new type of treatment for grass pollen allergy that gradually reduces allergy symptoms over time, rather than just temporarily relieving ...

US approves novel remedy for hayfever, pollen allergies (Update)

April 2, 2014
US regulators on Wednesday approved a French-made remedy for alleviating symptoms of hayfever and certain allergies to grass pollen.

FDA panel considers first pill for ragweed allergy

January 28, 2014
(HealthDay)—There may be good news coming in the form of a pill for the millions of Americans who suffer from ragweed allergy.

So long snow, hello pollen

April 6, 2014
(HealthDay)—Although it still feels like winter in many parts of the United States, it's time to prepare for spring allergies, an expert says.

Recommended for you

Genetic immune deficiency could hold key to severe childhood infections

July 18, 2017
A gene mutation making young children extremely vulnerable to common viruses may represent a new type of immunodeficiency, according to a University of Queensland researcher.

What are the best ways to diagnose and manage asthma?

July 18, 2017
What are the best ways to diagnose and manage asthma in adults? This can be tricky because asthma can stem from several causes and treatment often depends on what is triggering the asthma.

Large multi-ethnic study identifies many new genetic markers for lupus

July 17, 2017
Scientists from an international consortium have identified a large number of new genetic markers that predispose individuals to lupus.

Study finds molecular explanation for struggles of obese asthmatics

July 17, 2017
A large, bouquet-shaped molecule called surfactant protein A, or SP-A, may explain why obese asthma patients have harder-to-treat symptoms than their lean and overweight counterparts, according to a new study led by scientists ...

Team identifies potential cause for lupus

July 14, 2017
Leading rheumatologist and Feinstein Institute for Medical Research Professor Betty Diamond, MD, may have identified a protein as a cause for the adverse reaction of the immune system in patients suffering from lupus. A better ...

Immunosuppression underlies resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy

July 14, 2017
A Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) research team has identified a novel mechanism behind resistance to angiogenesis inhibitors - drugs that fight cancer by suppressing the formation of new blood vessels. In their report ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.