New FRAX App launched by the International Osteoporosis Foundation

April 2, 2014

Osteoporosis management guidelines around the world now recommend that fracture risk assessment be part of any clinical evaluation for osteoporosis. As a result, rather than relying on bone mineral density values alone, physicians now consider future fracture risk when making treatment decisions.

The WHO Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX®), developed by the Centre for Metabolic Bone Diseases at the University of Sheffield, is an easy-to-use tool to calculate an individual patient's 10-year probability of a major osteoporotic event (clinical spine, forearm, hip or shoulder fracture) and probability of an osteoporotic hip fracture. Since June 2011 alone, the online calculator has been used to assess risk in more than 8 million patients worldwide. Models are currently available for 53 countries.

Today, at the opening of the World Congress on Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases, the International Osteoporosis Foundation has launched a new FRAX App to meet the needs of clinicians worldwide. The new FRAX App allows for maximum flexibility in any clinical setting - anyone with a mobile phone or tablet can easily access the most up-to-date version of the calculator.

New FRAX App includes 58 models for 53 countries, full functionality:

  • PIN Protection for saved assessments;
  • Patient Results Management (save, delete & sort options);
  • E-mail sharing capability of patient assessment (responses and results);
  • Shake-to-Restart assessment functionality
  • Updates will be available as new country models are developed.

Free download of FRAX App until April 4, 2014

Due to developer agreement issues, the previous FRAX App version (version 1.x through 3.x) has been discontinued and clinicians who have downloaded the now obsolete version are invited to download the new FRAX App free of charge https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/frax/id847593214?ls=1&mt=8 After April 4 (09:00 CET) the App will return to its original low price of $5.99 USD.

All proceeds from the FRAX App go to the International Osteoporosis Foundation (IOF), which helps develop and maintain the FRAX tool.

Dr Eugene McCloskey, Professor in Adult Bone Disease and Honorary Consultant at the Metabolic Bone Centre, University of Sheffield UK, stated, "Osteoporosis management guidelines worldwide now recommend that FRAX be used as part of a clinical assessment and to make informed based on scientifically validated risk factors. We are pleased that with the new FRAX App healthcare professionals around the world will benefit from more flexibility in their use of this valuable new assessment tool."

Explore further: IOF position paper reveals enormous variation in worldwide usage of FRAX

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