'Often and early' gives children a taste for vegetables

May 31, 2014
Credit: Mary LaFrance/public domain

Exposing infants to a new vegetable early in life encourages them to eat more of it compared to offering novel vegetables to older children, new research from the University of Leeds suggests.

The researchers, led by Professor Marion Hetherington in the Institute of Psychological Sciences, also found that even fussy eaters are able to eat a bit more of a new vegetable each time they are offered it.

The research, involving babies and from the UK, France and Denmark, also dispelled the popular myth that vegetable tastes need to be masked or given by stealth in order for children to eat them.

Professor Hetherington said: "For parents who wish to encourage healthy eating in their children, our research offers some valuable guidance.

"If you want to encourage your children to eat vegetables, make sure you start early and often. Even if your child is fussy or does not like veggies, our study shows that 5-10 exposures will do the trick."

In the study, which was funded by the EU, the research team gave artichoke puree to 332 children from three countries aged from weaning age to 38 months. During the experiment each child was given between five and 10 servings of at least 100g of the artichoke puree in one of three versions: basic; sweetened, with added sugar; or added energy, where was mixed into the puree.

There was also little difference in the amounts eaten over time between those who were fed basic puree and those who ate the sweetened puree, which suggests that making vegetables sweeter does not make a significant difference to the amount children eat.

Younger children consumed more artichoke than . This is because after 24 months children become reluctant to try new things and start to reject foods – even those they previously liked. Among the children, four distinct groups emerged. Most children (40%) were "learners" who increased intake over time. Of the group, 21% consumed more than 75% of what was offered each time and they were called "plate-clearers". Those who ate less than 10g even by the fifth helping were classified as "non-eaters", amounting to 16% of the cohort, and the remainder were classified as "others" (23%) since their pattern of intake varied over time. Non-eaters, who tended to be older pre-school children, were the most fussy, the research found.

Globe artichoke was chosen as the sample because, as part of the research, parents were surveyed and artichoke was one of the least-offered vegetables. NHS guidelines are to start weaning children onto solid foods at six months.

The research has been published in the journal PLOS ONE.

Explore further: Creative ways to get children to eat vegetables

More information: "Learning to Eat Vegetables in Early Life: The Role of Timing, Age and Individual Eating Traits", PLOS ONE, 2014.

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TheGhostofOtto1923
1 / 5 (2) May 31, 2014
Perhaps part of the problem is that the cultivated stuff we eat today is not the fibrous, nutrient-dense fruits and vegetables we adapted to during the Pleistocene.

Chronic overpopulation caused crops to be selected for quantity over quality, which favored increased size with less nutrition. It also favored crops such as grasses with higher yields per acre.

The result was malnutrition. Grass is the last thing a hunter-gatherer would choose to eat. Children are not as conditioned as adults to eating what we think is good for us.
alfie_null
not rated yet Jun 01, 2014
Chronic overpopulation caused crops to be selected for quantity over quality, which favored increased size with less nutrition. It also favored crops such as grasses with higher yields per acre.

No. Population is irrelevant. Agriculture causes crops to be selected. Farmers plant what gives them the most return. And that's the same agriculture from which our modern social structure is derived. If it weren't for agriculture, we'd be little more than disparate tribes of greater apes scrabbling a mean existence.

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