ECO: stress in children impacts hormones, diet, adiposity

May 29, 2014
ECO: stress in children impacts hormones, diet, adiposity

(HealthDay)—For children, stress is associated with poorer diet, which stimulates adiposity, according to a study presented at the annual European Congress on Obesity, held from May 28 to 31 in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Nathalie Michels, Ph.D., from Ghent University in Belgium, and colleagues conducted a two-year longitudinal study to examine the relation between , diet, and adiposity in 312 Belgian children (aged 5 to 12 years). They measured stress data, including negative events, problem behavior, and negative emotions; food consumption; psychological eating behavior; and adiposity.

The researchers found that more sweet food consumption, , external eating, and restrained eating were reported by children with a high stress score. Stress was found to increase adiposity only for children with high sweet food intake and cortisol. There was a correlation between and an unhealthy diet, especially sweet foods. In girls, high cortisol correlated with higher leptin levels.

"The associations of cortisol with leptin and diet support the theory of cortisol-induced comfort food preference," Michels said in a statement. "Indeed children's stress makes their diet less healthy, which stimulates increases in body fat. This creates potential for a multi-part obesity prevention program, targeting stress (including coping skills) and lifestyle factors (e.g., ) together."

Explore further: Obese children have higher stress hormone levels than normal-weight peers

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Obese children have higher stress hormone levels than normal-weight peers

December 18, 2013
Obese children naturally produce higher levels of a key stress hormone than their normal weight peers, according to new research accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Weighing up the causes of obesity

January 18, 2012
Stress can make you fat – and being obese can create stress. A new hypothesis seeks to explain how.

Mediterranean diet may keep kids slimmer

May 28, 2014
(HealthDay)—Children who eat a Mediterranean-style diet are less likely to be overweight or obese than other youngsters, a new study suggests.

Exercise can increase physiological stress responses in the obese

May 13, 2014
The obese are advised to do physical exercise. But this can increase their physiological stress responses, and thereby make it more difficult to slim, according to a new Norwegian study.

Scientists develop predictor for people prone to obesity

September 19, 2013
Scientists from Monash University's School of Biomedical Sciences have found the stress hormone cortisol may act as a predictor of people susceptible to rapid weight gain.

Stress early in life leads to adulthood anxiety and preference for 'comfort foods'

July 30, 2013
Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, suggests that exposure to stress ...

Recommended for you

Small drop in measles vaccinations would have outsized effect, study estimates

July 24, 2017
Small reductions in childhood measles vaccinations in the United States would produce disproportionately large increases in the number of measles cases and in related public health costs, according to a new study by researchers ...

At the cellular level, a child's loss of a father is associated with increased stress

July 18, 2017
The absence of a father—due to incarceration, death, separation or divorce—has adverse physical and behavioral consequences for a growing child. But little is known about the biological processes that underlie this link ...

New comparison chart sheds light on babies' tears

July 10, 2017
A chart that enables parents and clinicians to calculate if a baby is crying more than it should in the first three months of its life has been created by a Kingston University London researcher, following a study of colic ...

Blood of SIDS infants contains high levels of serotonin

July 3, 2017
Blood samples from infants who died of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) had high levels of serotonin, a chemical that carries signals along and between nerves, according to a study funded in part by the National Institutes ...

Is your child's 'penicillin allergy' real?

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Many children suspected of being allergic to the inexpensive, first-line antibiotic penicillin actually aren't, new research indicates.

Probiotic supplements failed to prevent babies' infections

July 3, 2017
(HealthDay)—Probiotic supplements may not protect babies from catching colds or stomach bugs in day care, a new clinical trial suggests.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.