BioAnalytix advances the biologic drug development

June 11, 2014

Biologic drugs are highly complex, but they may be the answer to many medical illnesses and conditions that currently have no treatment available. The problem is, these drugs are not easy to characterize and test. Unlike most drugs that are chemically synthesized, biological products are protein-based and biologically produced. This means the drug development and testing stages are often much longer and more complex.

To answer this need, Northeastern University's College of Science and the Barnett Institute launched BioAnalytix two years ago. Led by CEO Kirtland Poss, BioAnalytix is now filling a critical gap in the area of biologic and launch. "What we do is unique and in demand," said Poss. "There is a lot of complexity to biologic drugs, and they need precise characterization throughout the development process and it's hard to do."

For the past 10 years, the Barnett Institute has been applying its characterization techniques to biologic drugs in development. In 2012, BioAnaytix was formed to help with the later-stage development decisions and regulatory filings for these cutting-edge drugs.

Currently, BioAnalytix is working with leading in the U.S, Europe, and Asia, typically on later stage drug development. This is the stage where a looks promising, and the drug company is looking to move on to Phase 3 clinical trials or regulatory approvals–the final stages before going on the market.

Over the past year, BioAnalytix has made some very significant progress. The company is hiring an industry-seasoned CFO, and has also moved to Cambridge, where it is surrounded by many leading pharmaceutical companies, but is still close to its original home, the Barnett Institute.

"BioAnaytix will continue to maintain and grow its affiliation with Northeastern University and the Barnett, because it is a very natural and real win for both of us," said Poss. "They benefit from more exposure to pharmaceutical companies, and we benefit from exposure to cutting-edge innovation and early stage research that is truly world-leading in these areas. As we grow, this will continue to benefit both."

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