Calcium and vitamin D supplementation improves metabolic profile of pregnant women with gestational diabetes

June 23, 2014

New research published in Diabetologia, the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes, shows that calcium and vitamin D supplementation improves the metabolic profile of pregnant women with gestational diabetes. The research is by Dr Ahmad Esmaillzadeh, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran, and colleagues.

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), a pregnancy complication, is characterised by carbohydrate intolerance and . Approximately 7% of all pregnancies in the United States are affected by GDM, but the prevalence ranges from 1 to 14% of all pregnancies in the world depending on the population studied and the diagnostic criteria used. GDM can increase the risk of pre-eclampsia, pre-term delivery and delivery by caesarean section.

"We are aware of no study that has examined the effect of joint calcium–vitamin D supplementation on insulin function, lipid profiles, inflammatory factors and biomarkers of oxidative stress in GDM," say the authors. "The current study was, therefore, done to investigate the effects of calcium plus vitamin D supplementation on metabolic status of with GDM."

This randomised placebo-controlled trial was performed on 56 women with GDM. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive calcium plus vitamin D supplements or placebo. Individuals in the calcium–vitamin D group (n=28) received 1000 mg calcium per day and 50000 IU (international units) vitamin D3 tablets two times during the study (at study baseline and day 21 of intervention) and those in the placebo group (n=28) received two placebos at the same time points. Fasting blood samples were taken at study baseline and after 6 weeks of intervention.

The authors found that, following the administration of plus vitamin D supplements, they observed significant reductions in fasting plasma glucose, insulin, and LDL or 'bad' cholesterol, as well as improvements in insulin sensitivity and increases in HDL or 'good' cholesterol, compared with those patients who took placebo.

The authors say: "Calcium plus vitamin D supplementation in GDM women had beneficial effects on ...this is important because elevated circulating levels of inflammatory markers and impaired insulin metabolism in GDM can predict the progression to type 2 diabetes (T2D) later in life and neonatal complications. Impaired insulin metabolism in women with GDM can result in adverse long term maternal outcomes and increased perinatal morbidity (babies large for gestational age, birth trauma, pre-eclampsia), and long-term consequences in the offspring. In addition, increased inflammatory markers in GDM might predict the future development of both metabolic and cardiovascular disease."

Explore further: Supplements of calcium and vitamin D may have too much for some older women

Related Stories

Supplements of calcium and vitamin D may have too much for some older women

June 18, 2014
Calcium and vitamin D are commonly recommended for older women, but the usual supplements may send calcium excretion and blood levels too high for some women, shows a new study published online today in Menopause, the journal ...

Raising low vitamin D levels lowers risk of prediabetes progressing to diabetes

June 23, 2014
Vitamin D and calcium supplementation along with diet and exercise may prevent type 2 diabetes in prediabetic individuals who have insufficient vitamin D in their bodies, a study from India suggests. The results were presented ...

Calcium and vitamin D improve cholesterol in postmenopausal women

March 5, 2014
Calcium and vitamin D supplements after menopause can improve women's cholesterol profiles. And much of that effect is tied to raising vitamin D levels, finds a new study from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) just published ...

4.4 mmol/L is optimal fasting glucose cutoff for GDM screening

April 16, 2013
(HealthDay)—A fasting plasma glucose value of 4.4 mmol/L is the optimal cut point for determining which pregnant Chinese women need a 75-g 2-h oral glucose tolerance test offered at 24 to 28 weeks' gestation, according ...

Gestational diabetes ups costs of maternity care by one-third

January 22, 2013
(HealthDay)—Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are significantly more likely to receive an emergency cesarean section, have their infant admitted to a neonatal care unit, and incur significantly higher maternity ...

Recommended for you

Alzheimer's drug cuts hallmark inflammation related to metabolic syndrome by 25 percent

July 20, 2017
An existing Alzheimer's medication slashes inflammation and insulin resistance in patients with metabolic syndrome, a potential therapeutic intervention for a highly dangerous condition affecting 30 percent of adults in the ...

Diabetes or its precursor affects 100 million Americans

July 19, 2017
Almost one-third of the US population—100 million people—either has diabetes or its precursor condition, known as pre-diabetes, said a government report Tuesday.

One virus may protect against type 1 diabetes, others may increase risk

July 11, 2017
Doctors can't predict who will develop type 1 diabetes, a chronic autoimmune disease in which the immune system destroys the cells needed to control blood-sugar levels, requiring daily insulin injections and continual monitoring.

Diabetes complications are a risk factor for repeat hospitalizations, study shows

July 7, 2017
For patients with diabetes, one reason for hospitalization and unplanned hospital readmission is severe dysglycemia (uncontrolled hyperglycemia - high blood sugar, or hypoglycemia - low blood sugar), says new research published ...

Researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetes

July 7, 2017
Utilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics

Immune system killer cells increase risk of diabetes

July 6, 2017
More than half of the German population is obese. One effect of obesity is to chronically activate the immune system, placing it under continuous stress. Researchers in Jens Brüning's team at the Max-Planck-Institute for ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.