Court: Patients responsible for outcomes of risky behavior

June 28, 2014
Court: patients responsible for outcomes of risky behavior

(HealthDay)—The Colorado Supreme Court has ruled that patients can be at least partially responsible for their health outcomes resulting from their own unhealthy behavior, according to the American Medical Association (AMA), which supported the physicians in the case.

In the case of Kelly v. Haralampopoulos, two Colorado physicians were accused of medical liability following a patient's cardiac arrest during a procedure performed after the patient's presentation with . Close friends' testimony, however, indicated that the patient had been recreationally using a dangerous drug that is known to cause .

A trial court allowed the friends' testimony to be considered in the case. However, the appeals court denied admittance of the friends' testimony and overturned the lower court's decision in favor of the physicians.

"The physicians appealed to the Colorado Supreme Court, which upheld the decision of the trial court, in a ruling upholding that patients can be at least partially responsible for their health outcomes as a result of their own ," the AMA said in a news release.

Explore further: Supreme Court takes up drug company dispute

More information: More Information

Related Stories

Supreme Court takes up drug company dispute

March 31, 2014
The Supreme Court is wading into a patent dispute between rival pharmaceutical companies over a multiple sclerosis treatment.

Supreme Court of Canada ruling on life support has wider impact: Hassan Rasouli

February 10, 2014
In the debate over whether to withdraw life support for patients who have no hope of recovery, the recent judgment by the Supreme Court of Canada on the Hassan Rasouli case in Ontario has broader implications for health care ...

Canada upholds law against assisted suicide (Update)

October 10, 2013
British Columbia's appeals court overturned a lower court ruling Thursday that found Canada's law against physician-assisted suicide to be unconstitutional.

Recommended for you

Who uses phone apps to track sleep habits? Mostly the healthy and wealthy in US

January 16, 2018
The profile of most Americans who use popular mobile phone apps that track sleep habits is that they are relatively affluent, claim to eat well, and say they are in good health, even if some of them tend to smoke.

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States

January 15, 2018
With countless medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that life expectancy in the United States would improve. Yet according to recent studies, there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in ...

Teens likely to crave junk food after watching TV ads

January 15, 2018
Teenagers who watch more than three hours of commercial TV a day are more likely to eat hundreds of extra junk food snacks, according to a report by Cancer Research UK.

Can muesli help against arthritis?

January 15, 2018
It is well known that healthy eating increases a general sense of wellbeing. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have now discovered that a fibre-rich diet can have a positive influence ...

Your dishwasher is not as sterile as you think

January 13, 2018
(HealthDay)—Your dishwasher may get those plates spotless, but it is also probably teeming with bacteria and fungus, a new study suggests.

Study reveals what sleep talkers have to say

January 12, 2018
A team of researchers with members from several institutions in France has conducted a study regarding sleep talking and has found that most sleep talking is not only negative in nature, but involves a large amount of swearing. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.