Denosumab treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis increases bone density

June 23, 2014, The Endocrine Society

Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis who take denosumab long-term have increased bone density, sustained low rate of fractures, and a favorable benefit/risk profile, a new multinational study finds. The results were presented Sunday, June 22, at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.

"This study provides reassurance to physicians and their patients that long-term treatment with for at least 8 years leads to significant increases in bone density and is safe for appropriately selected women with postmenopausal osteoporosis," said lead study author E. Michael Lewiecki, MD, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in Albuquerque. "It's important to note that the overall risk of side effects did not increase over time."

Osteoporosis is a long-term disease that occurs when the creation of new bone doesn't keep up with the removal of old bone. The disorder primarily affects women past menopause, causing their bones to become weak and brittle, sometimes so much so that a fall or even a cough can cause a fracture. The treatments that reduce fracture risk by increasing bone density have important long-term effects.

This study showed that long-term treatment with denosumab was safe and resulted in continuing increases in over the 8 years of treatment, with persistently low fracture rates.

To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of denosumab for up to 10 years, Dr. Lewiecki and his colleagues conducted the ongoing multinational FREEDOM clinical trial. In this study, the researchers present data from up to 8 years of continued denosumab treatment.

Among the almost 8,000 women originally enrolled in the FREEDOM trial, denosumab reduced their risk of vertebral by 68%, reduced their risk of hip fractures by 40%, and reduced their risk of nonvertebral fractures by 20%, compared with placebo. The women taking the drug had no increase in their overall risk of cancer, infection, cardiovascular disease, delayed fracture healing, or hypocalcemia.

All the roughly 3,000 in this long-term extension of the trial took denosumab for up to 8 years, and overall, they showed a continued increase in their mean , with a cumulative 8-year gain of 18.4% at the lumbar spine and 8.3% at the total hip, with few fractures and a good safety profile.

Explore further: Romosozumab significantly increases bone mineral density and bone content compared with teriparatide

Related Stories

Romosozumab significantly increases bone mineral density and bone content compared with teriparatide

June 11, 2014
A new study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) shows that in postmenopausal women with low bone mass, romosozumab significantly increased bone mineral density and bone content ...

Denosumab does not delay nonvertebral fracture healing

December 19, 2012
(HealthDay)—Denosumab does not appear to delay fracture healing or contribute to other complications when used to treat postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, according to research published in the Dec. 5 issue of The ...

Study looks at predicting fracture risk after women stop bisphosphonate therapy

May 5, 2014
Age and testing of hip bone mineral density (BDM) when postmenopausal women discontinue bisphosphonate therapy can help predict the likelihood of fractures over the next five years.

New osteoporosis drug combination outperforms current alternatives

May 14, 2013
A combination of two FDA-approved osteoporosis drugs with different mechanisms of action was found to increase bone density better than treatment with either drug alone in a small clinical trial. As reported in paper receiving ...

Osteoporosis drugs compared for side effects, efficacy

November 28, 2013
A study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of two popular osteoporosis drugs, denosumab and zoledronic acid, found that denosumab had a significantly greater effect on increasing spine bone mineral density and zoledronic ...

WHO tool underestimates need for osteoporosis treatment, study finds

April 29, 2014
The World Health Organization's tool for assessing bone fracture risk underestimates the true dangers for people who are younger than 65 or have been treated for a single broken bone, according to a new study published in ...

Recommended for you

Creation of synthetic horsepox virus could lead to more effective smallpox vaccine

January 19, 2018
UAlberta researchers created a new synthetic virus that could lead to the development of a more effective vaccine against smallpox. The discovery demonstrates how techniques based on the use of synthetic DNA can be used to ...

Study ends debate over role of steroids in treating septic shock

January 19, 2018
The results from the largest ever study of septic shock could improve treatment for critically ill patients and save health systems worldwide hundreds of millions of dollars each year.

New approach could help curtail hospitalizations due to influenza infection

January 18, 2018
More than 700,000 Americans were hospitalized due to illnesses associated with the seasonal flu during the 2014-15 flu season, according to federal estimates. A radical new approach to vaccine development at UCLA may help ...

Zika virus damages placenta, which may explain malformed babies

January 18, 2018
Though the Zika virus is widely known for a recent outbreak that caused children to be born with microencephaly, or having a small head, and other malformations, scientists have struggled to explain how the virus affects ...

Certain flu virus mutations may compensate for fitness costs of other mutations

January 18, 2018
Seasonal flu viruses continually undergo mutations that help them evade the human immune system, but some of these mutations can reduce a virus's potency. According to new research published in PLOS Pathogens, certain mutations ...

Study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function

January 17, 2018
Infections of the skin or other soft tissues with the hard-to-treat MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) bacteria appear to permanently compromise the lymphatic system, which is crucial to immune system function. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.