Denosumab treatment for postmenopausal osteoporosis increases bone density

June 23, 2014

Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis who take denosumab long-term have increased bone density, sustained low rate of fractures, and a favorable benefit/risk profile, a new multinational study finds. The results were presented Sunday, June 22, at ICE/ENDO 2014, the joint meeting of the International Society of Endocrinology and the Endocrine Society in Chicago.

"This study provides reassurance to physicians and their patients that long-term treatment with for at least 8 years leads to significant increases in bone density and is safe for appropriately selected women with postmenopausal osteoporosis," said lead study author E. Michael Lewiecki, MD, clinical assistant professor of medicine at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine in Albuquerque. "It's important to note that the overall risk of side effects did not increase over time."

Osteoporosis is a long-term disease that occurs when the creation of new bone doesn't keep up with the removal of old bone. The disorder primarily affects women past menopause, causing their bones to become weak and brittle, sometimes so much so that a fall or even a cough can cause a fracture. The treatments that reduce fracture risk by increasing bone density have important long-term effects.

This study showed that long-term treatment with denosumab was safe and resulted in continuing increases in over the 8 years of treatment, with persistently low fracture rates.

To evaluate the long-term efficacy and safety of denosumab for up to 10 years, Dr. Lewiecki and his colleagues conducted the ongoing multinational FREEDOM clinical trial. In this study, the researchers present data from up to 8 years of continued denosumab treatment.

Among the almost 8,000 women originally enrolled in the FREEDOM trial, denosumab reduced their risk of vertebral by 68%, reduced their risk of hip fractures by 40%, and reduced their risk of nonvertebral fractures by 20%, compared with placebo. The women taking the drug had no increase in their overall risk of cancer, infection, cardiovascular disease, delayed fracture healing, or hypocalcemia.

All the roughly 3,000 in this long-term extension of the trial took denosumab for up to 8 years, and overall, they showed a continued increase in their mean , with a cumulative 8-year gain of 18.4% at the lumbar spine and 8.3% at the total hip, with few fractures and a good safety profile.

Explore further: Romosozumab significantly increases bone mineral density and bone content compared with teriparatide

Related Stories

Romosozumab significantly increases bone mineral density and bone content compared with teriparatide

June 11, 2014
A new study presented today at the European League Against Rheumatism Annual Congress (EULAR 2014) shows that in postmenopausal women with low bone mass, romosozumab significantly increased bone mineral density and bone content ...

Denosumab does not delay nonvertebral fracture healing

December 19, 2012
(HealthDay)—Denosumab does not appear to delay fracture healing or contribute to other complications when used to treat postmenopausal women with osteoporosis, according to research published in the Dec. 5 issue of The ...

Study looks at predicting fracture risk after women stop bisphosphonate therapy

May 5, 2014
Age and testing of hip bone mineral density (BDM) when postmenopausal women discontinue bisphosphonate therapy can help predict the likelihood of fractures over the next five years.

New osteoporosis drug combination outperforms current alternatives

May 14, 2013
A combination of two FDA-approved osteoporosis drugs with different mechanisms of action was found to increase bone density better than treatment with either drug alone in a small clinical trial. As reported in paper receiving ...

Osteoporosis drugs compared for side effects, efficacy

November 28, 2013
A study comparing the efficacy and tolerability of two popular osteoporosis drugs, denosumab and zoledronic acid, found that denosumab had a significantly greater effect on increasing spine bone mineral density and zoledronic ...

WHO tool underestimates need for osteoporosis treatment, study finds

April 29, 2014
The World Health Organization's tool for assessing bone fracture risk underestimates the true dangers for people who are younger than 65 or have been treated for a single broken bone, according to a new study published in ...

Recommended for you

Google searches can be used to track dengue in underdeveloped countries

July 20, 2017
An analytical tool that combines Google search data with government-provided clinical data can quickly and accurately track dengue fever in less-developed countries, according to new research published in PLOS Computational ...

MRSA emerged years before methicillin was even discovered

July 19, 2017
Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) emerged long before the introduction of the antibiotic methicillin into clinical practice, according to a study published in the open access journal Genome Biology. It was ...

New test distinguishes Zika from similar viral infections

July 18, 2017
A new test is the best-to-date in differentiating Zika virus infections from infections caused by similar viruses. The antibody-based assay, developed by researchers at UC Berkeley and Humabs BioMed, a private biotechnology ...

'Superbugs' study reveals complex picture of E. coli bloodstream infections

July 18, 2017
The first large-scale genetic study of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cultured from patients with bloodstream infections in England showed that drug resistant 'superbugs' are not always out-competing other strains. Research by ...

Ebola virus can persist in monkeys that survived disease, even after symptoms disappear

July 17, 2017
Ebola virus infection can be detected in rhesus monkeys that survive the disease and no longer show symptoms, according to research published by Army scientists in today's online edition of the journal Nature Microbiology. ...

Mountain gorillas have herpes virus similar to that found in humans

July 13, 2017
Scientists from the University of California, Davis, have detected a herpes virus in wild mountain gorillas that is very similar to the Epstein-Barr virus in humans, according to a study published today in the journal Scientific ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.