Doctors' group calls for tougher rules on sale of E-cigarettes

June 10, 2014
Doctors' group calls for tougher rules on sale of E-cigarettes
American Medical Association recommendations include minimum age purchase rule, flavor restrictions.

(HealthDay)—The American Medical Association on Tuesday called for tighter restrictions on the sale and marketing of electronic cigarettes.

Among the new recommendations coming from the largest doctors' group in the United States are a minimum age purchase rule; child-proof and tamper-proof packaging; restrictions on flavors that appeal to ; more extensive product labels; and a ban on unsupported claims that the devices help people quit smoking.

The group also wants the federal government to force e-cigarette makers to provide details about the design, content and emissions of the devices, and to boost efforts to prevent marketing of e-cigarettes to minors.

The use of e-cigarettes by middle school and in the United States rose from 3.3 percent in 2011 to 6.8 percent in 2012, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The new AMA policy extends the group's existing policy that was adopted in 2010 and calls for the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to subject all e-cigarettes to the same regulations and oversight applied to tobacco and nicotine products.

"The AMA supports an FDA proposal to fill the gap in federal regulations on purchasing, labeling, packaging and advertising of ," incoming AMA President Dr. Robert Wah said in a news release from the group.

"The new policy will guide the AMA's future efforts to strongly encourage the proposed FDA regulation as a notable and important step to improve public health and deter the sale of electronic cigarettes to minors," he added.

"Improving the health of the nation is AMA's top priority and we will continue to advocate for policies that help reduce the burden of preventable diseases like cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, which can both be linked to smoking," Wah concluded.

Explore further: New York City imposes strict e-cigarette ban

More information: The U.S. National Institute on Drug Abuse has more about e-cigarettes.

Related Stories

New York City imposes strict e-cigarette ban

April 29, 2014
A ban on electronic cigarettes went into effect Tuesday in New York restaurants, bars, parks, beaches and other public places.

US lawmakers: No e-cigarette sales or ads to youths

April 14, 2014
US lawmakers want electronic cigarettes to be treated just like tobacco products when it comes to barring the sales and marketing of the controversial devices to children.

Congressional report presses for e-cigarette rules

April 14, 2014
A new Congressional report says concerns about electronic cigarettes underscore the need to regulate the fast-growing industry.

Role of E-cigarettes in eliminating tobacco use discussed

December 19, 2013
(HealthDay)—The public health issues relating to electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) and their role in eliminating tobacco use are discussed in a perspective piece published online Dec. 18 in the New England Journal of ...

44 percent of adults worry e-cigarettes will encourage kids to start smoking tobacco

December 18, 2013
Adults nationwide are concerned about the use of e-cigarettes by children and teens, with 44 percent indicating worries that the devices will encourage kids to use tobacco products, according to a new poll from the University ...

FDA asks public to join battle against smoking by children

May 14, 2014
(HealthDay)—The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants your help in keeping children away from tobacco.

Recommended for you

High-fat diet in pregnancy can cause mental health problems in offspring

July 21, 2017
A high-fat diet not only creates health problems for expectant mothers, but new research in an animal model suggests it alters the development of the brain and endocrine system of their offspring and has a long-term impact ...

To combat teen smoking, health experts recommend R ratings for movies that depict tobacco use

July 21, 2017
Public health experts have an unusual suggestion for reducing teen smoking: Give just about any movie that depicts tobacco use an automatic R rating.

Opioids and obesity, not 'despair deaths,' raising mortality rates for white Americans

July 20, 2017
Drug-related deaths among middle-aged white men increased more than 25-fold between 1980 and 2014, with the bulk of that spike occurring since the mid-1990s when addictive prescription opioids became broadly available, according ...

Aging Americans enjoy longer life, better health when avoiding three risky behaviors

July 20, 2017
We've heard it before from our doctors and other health experts: Keep your weight down, don't smoke and cut back on the alcohol if you want to live longer.

Parents have critical role in preventing teen drinking

July 20, 2017
Fewer teenagers are drinking alcohol but more needs to be done to curb the drinking habits of Australian school students, based on the findings of the latest study by Adelaide researchers.

Fresh fish oil lowers diabetes risk in rat offspring

July 19, 2017
Fresh fish oil given to overweight pregnant rats prevented their offspring from developing a major diabetes risk factor, Auckland researchers have found.

1 comment

Adjust slider to filter visible comments by rank

Display comments: newest first

IggyDalrymple
not rated yet Jun 11, 2014
Mayday, mayday! Major threat to government revenues (taxes).

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.