Detailed snapshot of adult Californians' health by race, ethnicity

June 17, 2014 by Venetia Lai

(Medical Xpress)—The UCLA Center for Health Policy Research has issued a series of easy-to-read fact sheets with health statistics on five major ethnic and racial groups in California—whites, Latinos, blacks, Asians and American Indians/Alaska Natives, as well as more detailed information on Latino and Asian subgroups.

A new visual report also provides infographics on key findings from the profiles, which used data from the 2011–12 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) to explore a range of health topics, from insurance status to fruit-and-vegetable consumption to binge drinking.

The profiles provide a detailed and reliable source of information for policymakers, advocates, researchers, media and others interested in understanding the health of adult Californians, particularly those from previously understudied ethnic and racial minority groups.

Of specific interest are key for five groups within California's Latino population (which accounts for 9.5 million of the state's 27.8 million adults), including separate data for U.S.-born Mexicans and Mexicans born outside of the U.S., and health information on half a dozen Asian groups (3.9 million). Latino ethnic groups covered include Mexican, Salvadoran, Guatemalan, other Central American and South American. Asian groups include Chinese, Filipino, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese and South Asian.

Among the findings for California's estimated 27.8 million adults:

Number of uninsured

Approximately 6.2 million California adults (26.6 percent of the state's adult population) had no health insurance for all or part of the past year.

Insured through work

Nearly six of 10 Asians in the state had employment-based , compared with five of 10 Californians overall. Among Asian , the figure ranged from a high of more than seven of 10 for South Asians to fewer than four of 10 for Koreans. For Latinos overall, fewer than four of 10 had employment-based insurance was, while Guatemalans had the lowest rate—two of 10.

Mexican groups and poverty

More than 70 percent of adult Mexicans born outside the U.S. had household incomes under 200 percent of the (less than $46,100 for a family of four in 2012). For U.S.-born Mexicans, the proportion was much lower, at 44.3 percent.

Walking and health

About one-third of all Californians walked regularly on a weekly basis. Latinos had one of the highest rates, at nearly 35 percent, and Salvadorans were the most frequent walkers, with a 41 percent rate.

Californians and obesity

More than 6.8 million Californians—a full quarter of the adult population—were obese. Less than one in 10 Asians was obese, while nearly four in 10 blacks and American Indians/Alaska Natives were.

Explore further: Two million Californians report mental health needs; most receive little or no treatment

More information: Read the full 2011–2012 Racial and Ethnicity Health Profiles: healthpolicy.ucla.edu/health-p … -Race_Ethnicity.aspx

Related Stories

Two million Californians report mental health needs; most receive little or no treatment

November 30, 2011
Nearly 2 million adults in California, about 8 percent of the population, need mental health treatment, but the majority receive no services or inadequate services, despite a state law mandating that health insurance providers ...

Pacific Islanders, South Asians and Filipinos have higher rates of diabetes than all other ethnic groups

October 16, 2012
(Medical Xpress)—Rates of diagnosed diabetes are much higher among some Asian subgroups than is apparent when aggregating all Asians as a whole, according to a new study by the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research and ...

Undocumented immigrants use fewer health services than US-born residents

May 7, 2014
Undocumented immigrants in California see the doctor and visit emergency rooms significantly less often than U.S. citizens and documented immigrants, according to a study by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research published ...

Race a bigger health care barrier than insurance status

November 8, 2013
Race appears to be a larger factor in disparities in health care use than whether or not a person has health insurance, finds a new study in the Journal of Health Care for the Poor and Underserved. Blacks, Hispanics, and ...

AP-NORC releases new analysis on Californians' experiences with long-term care

June 10, 2014
The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research has released an issue brief containing results of a survey on long-term care in California. With a particular focus on demographics, the issue brief provides new ...

Recommended for you

To reduce postoperative pain, consider sleep—and caffeine

August 18, 2017
Sleep is essential for good mental and physical health, and chronic insufficient sleep increases the risk for several chronic health problems.

Despite benefits, half of parents against later school start times

August 18, 2017
Leading pediatrics and sleep associations agree: Teens shouldn't start school so early.

Doctors exploring how to prescribe income security

August 18, 2017
Physicians at St. Michael's Hospital are studying how full-time income support workers hired by health-care clinics can help vulnerable patients or those living in poverty improve their finances and their health.

Schoolchildren who use e-cigarettes are more likely to try tobacco

August 17, 2017
Vaping - or the use of e-cigarettes - is widely accepted as a safer option for people who are already smoking.

Federal snack program does not yield expected impacts, researchers find

August 17, 2017
A well-intentioned government regulation designed to offer healthier options in school vending machines has failed to instill better snacking habits in a sample of schools in Appalachian Virginia, according to a study by ...

Study shows cigarette makers shifted stance on nicotine patches, gum

August 17, 2017
The use of nicotine patches, gum, lozenges, inhalers or nasal sprays—together called "nicotine replacement therapy," or NRT—came into play in 1984 as prescription medicine, which when combined with counseling, helped ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.