New drug-eluting stents more effective

July 15, 2014 by Kim Hovestad, University of Twente

Research conducted by University of Twente PhD candidate Kenneth Tandjung has shown that the new generation of drug-eluting stents, which is being used in coronary angioplasty to open narrowed coronary arteries, is safe and more effective than previous generations. He also looked into the use of an additional blood thinner after coronary angioplasty, the influence of diabetes and the results of coronary angioplasty in women. Tandjung is a cardiologist in training at the Thorax Centre of the Medisch Spectrum Twente hospital in Enschede.

Tandjung: "Nowadays we often use drug-eluting stents when performing coronary angioplasty. We're now in the third generation of this type of stent. All three generations are safe, but the third is easier to insert. It's more effective, more efficient and, eventually, cheaper."

Bloodthinners after coronary angioplasty

Tandjung tested the time required to use an additional blood thinner alongside the regular blood thinner after having undergone coronary angioplasty. In the Netherlands, the extra blood thinner is used for up to one year following treatment. Tandjung's research shows this use to be safe. In some countries, additional blood thinners are prescribed for very long periods of time because of the fear that a stent might clot after treatment. However, the longer extra are used, the greater the risk of patients bleeding.

Patients with undiagnosed diabetes

Tandjung also discovered that patients with run a higher risk of having a myocardial infarctionafter a coronary angioplasty. This underlines the benefit of thoroughly screening for risk factors for cardiovascular diseases before a patient undergoes coronary angioplasty.

Women

In his research, Tandjung reviewed the results of coronary angioplasty in women separately. The research shows that the results of the treatment in women were just as good as the results of the treatment in men, irrespective of the type of drug-eluting stent used. This had not been previously investigated with these newer generation drug-eluting stents. Women are often underrepresented in research into cardiovascular diseases. In the past, were found to exhibit poorer results than men after undergoing .

Explore further: For some women facing angioplasty, wrist entry may be better, study finds

Related Stories

For some women facing angioplasty, wrist entry may be better, study finds

November 1, 2013
(HealthDay)—For women at high risk for bleeding during angioplasty, the wrist may be a better entry site than the groin, a new study indicates.

First robotically assisted coronary stenting procedure performed at Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center

December 23, 2013
The interventional cardiology team led by Ehtisham Mahmud, MD, FACC, at UC San Diego Sulpizio Cardiovascular Center (SCVC) has successfully completed the first two robotically-assisted coronary angioplasty/stent procedures ...

Drug-eluting stents demonstrate better outcomes after one year than bare metal stents

March 31, 2014
Use of drug-eluting stents is associated with a lower risk of major cardiovascular events at one year compared to bare metal stents when followed by an individualized course of blood-thinning medication among patients previously ...

For patients with diabetes, angioplasty and bypass surgery lead to similar long-term benefits for quality of life

October 15, 2013
For patients with diabetes and coronary artery disease in more than one artery, treatment with coronary artery bypass graft surgery provided slightly better health status and quality of life between 6 months and 2 years than ...

Dual antiplatelet therapy following coronary stent implantation is associated with improved outcomes

July 9, 2013
Emmanouil S. Brilakis, M.D., Ph.D., of the VA North Texas Health Care System and University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, and colleagues conducted a review of medical literature regarding optimal medical ...

Recommended for you

Starting periods before age of 12 linked to heightened risk of heart disease and stroke

January 15, 2018
Starting periods early—before the age of 12—is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease and stroke in later life, suggests an analysis of data from the UK Biobank study, published online in the journal Heart.

'Decorated' stem cells could offer targeted heart repair

January 10, 2018
Although cardiac stem cell therapy is a promising treatment for heart attack patients, directing the cells to the site of an injury - and getting them to stay there - remains challenging. In a new pilot study using an animal ...

Two simple tests could help to pinpoint cause of stroke

January 10, 2018
Detecting the cause of the deadliest form of stroke could be improved by a simple blood test added alongside a routine brain scan, research suggests.

Exercise is good for the heart, high blood pressure is bad—researchers find out why

January 10, 2018
When the heart is put under stress during exercise, it is considered healthy. Yet stress due to high blood pressure is bad for the heart. Why? And is this always the case? Researchers of the German Centre for Cardiovascular ...

Heart-muscle patches made with human cells improve heart attack recovery

January 10, 2018
Large, human cardiac-muscle patches created in the lab have been tested, for the first time, on large animals in a heart attack model. This clinically relevant approach showed that the patches significantly improved recovery ...

Place of residence linked to heart failure risk

January 9, 2018
Location. Location. Location.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.