Mental health issues in children with relatives who participated in manhunt after Boston Marathon

July 21, 2014, Wiley

Children with relatives who were called upon to participate in the interagency manhunt following the Boston Marathon attack carried a particularly heavy mental health burden, according to a Depression and Anxiety study that included surveys of Boston-area parents and other caretakers.

Researchers found that the proportion of with likely PTSD was 5.7 times higher among youth with relatives in the manhunt than among youth without. Children with in the manhunt also experienced more emotional symptoms and hyperactivity or inattention.

"Beyond informing our specific understanding of kids' after the Boston Marathon bombing, this work also speaks more broadly to the very heavy mental health toll that can be endured by having a parent employed in a high-risk occupation characterized by day-to-day confrontations with physical danger and extreme stress," said lead author Dr. Jonathan Comer. "When these kids are suffering, their needs may be difficult to detect, but we must find ways to get them the help that they need."

Explore further: Boston marathon bombings left psychological scars on kids

More information: Comer, J. S., Kerns, C. E., Elkins, R. M., Edson, A. L., Chou, T., Dantowitz, A., Miguel, E., Brown, B., Coxe, S. and Green, J. G. (2014), ADJUSTMENT AMONG CHILDREN WITH RELATIVES WHO PARTICIPATED IN THE MANHUNT FOLLOWING THE BOSTON MARATHON ATTACK. Depress. Anxiety, 31: 542. DOI: 10.1002/da.22281

Related Stories

Boston marathon bombings left psychological scars on kids

June 2, 2014
(HealthDay)—Children who witnessed the bombings at the Boston Marathon were six times more likely to develop symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) than those who didn't see the attack, new research shows.

Brain responses to emotional images predict PTSD symptoms after Boston Marathon bombing

July 15, 2014
The area of the brain that plays a primary role in emotional learning and the acquisition of fear – the amygdala – may hold the key to who is most vulnerable to post-traumatic stress disorder.

Strategic program helps families counter depression and anxiety

July 14, 2014
A new program aimed at reducing the impact of parents' anxiety or depression on the family is being trialled in Australia.

Focus needed on youth mental health

May 7, 2014
There is a need for on-going youth mental health monitoring and interventions, given a small decline in aspects of self-reported mental health among New Zealand secondary school students.

Study links domestic abuse to mental health problems in new mothers

April 14, 2014
A new study shows that domestic abuse is closely linked to postpartum mental health problems, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), in mothers. The research also found that specific types of abuse ...

Recommended for you

Study: No evidence to support link between violent video games and behaviour

January 16, 2018
Researchers at the University of York have found no evidence to support the theory that video games make players more violent.

Study listens in on speech development in early childhood

January 15, 2018
If you've ever listened in on two toddlers at play, you might have wondered how much of their babbling might get lost in translation. A new study from the University of Toronto provides surprising insights into how much children ...

Study suggests people dislike you more for humblebragging than for regular boasting

January 12, 2018
A team of researchers from Harvard University and UNC-Chapel Hill has conducted a study regarding humblebragging—in which a person boasts about an achievement but tries to make it sound less boastful by minimizing it—and ...

Can writing your 'to-do's' help you to doze? Study suggests jotting down tasks can speed the trip to dreamland

January 11, 2018
Writing a "to-do" list at bedtime may aid in falling asleep, according to a Baylor University study. Research compared sleep patterns of participants who took five minutes to write down upcoming duties versus participants ...

Study identifies brain circuit controlling social behavior

January 11, 2018
A new study by researchers at Roche in Basel, Switzerland has identified a key brain region of the neural circuit that controls social behavior. Increasing the activity of this region, called the habenula, led to social problems ...

Tamper-resistant oxycodone tablets have no impact on overall opioid use

January 11, 2018
The introduction of tamper-resistant opioid tablets does not have an effect on rates of opioid use or harms at a population level, according to a new study led by the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.