New gluten-free ingredient may cause allergic reaction

August 26, 2014 by Lindsey Elliott
Consumers with peanut allergies need to watch for lupin on the labels of gluten free foods. Lupins are legumes. Credit: U.S. Food and Drug Administration

(Medical Xpress)—A popular new ingredient in gluten-free products could be causing an allergic reaction, according to a Kansas State University food safety specialist.

Lupin, a legume belonging to the same as peanuts, is showing up as a wheat replacement in an increasing number of gluten-free products. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration is now issuing an alert, urging consumers with peanut and soybean allergies to read labels before buying these products.

"Lupin is a yellow-colored bean that's very popular in Europe, Mediterranean countries, Australia and New Zealand," said Karen Blakeslee, Kansas State University extension specialist in science and coordinator of the Rapid Response Center. "However, it is new to the United States and because of that, many consumers have never heard of it and may not realize that has the same protein that causes to peanuts and soybeans."

Allergic reactions can have various symptoms, including hives, swelling of the lips, vomiting, breathing difficulties and anaphylactic shock. Even those without allergies to legume products need to be aware of the ingredient.

"You can become allergic to something at any point in your life," Blakeslee said. "If you do start seeing any symptoms of an allergic reaction, stop eating the food immediately and contact your doctor."

The FDA expects lupin to become a popular product in the gluten-free arena because of its many health qualities. It is high in protein and in dietary fiber—which helps lower cholesterol—and is low in fat.

Manufacturers are required to list lupin on the food label. The FDA is actively monitoring complaints of lupin allergies by U.S. consumers.

Explore further: Cross-reactivity between peanuts and other legumes can lead to serious allergic reactions

Related Stories

Cross-reactivity between peanuts and other legumes can lead to serious allergic reactions

May 14, 2012
Many foods can lead to allergic reactions and this situation is further complicated by so-called cross-reactions, whereby an allergy to one particular food can trigger allergic reactions to another food. There are no treatments ...

New food allergy model for fenugreek developed

December 14, 2011
A mouse model to investigate allergy to fenugreek has been developed by Norwegian researchers. The model can also be used to study cross-reactivity to peanut, soy and lupin, major food allergens with public health relevance.

FDA warns of allergic reactions with acne products

June 25, 2014
Federal health officials are warning consumers who use popular anti-acne treatments about rare but potentially deadly allergic reactions that can cause swelling of the face and difficulty breathing.

Food safety specialist says food poisoning cases underreported

June 19, 2014
(Medical Xpress)—You've probably heard of norovirus, salmonella and E. coli, but would you know if you were sick with one of these foodborne illnesses? A Kansas State University food safety specialist says there are distinct ...

New target identified for food allergy therapy: Blocking enzyme prevents allergic reaction to peanuts

August 1, 2013
(Medical Xpress)—Researchers at National Jewish Health have identified an enzyme that is essential to the allergic reaction to peanuts. Blocking the enzyme's activity in sensitized mice prevented diarrhea and inflammation, ...

Recommended for you

Immune system can be modulated by targeted manipulation of cell metabolism

August 21, 2017
In its attempt to fight a serious bacterial infection, caused by listeria, for example, the immune system can become so over-activated that the resulting inflammatory response and its consequences can quickly lead to death. ...

Australian researchers in peanut allergy breakthrough

August 17, 2017
Australian researchers have reported a major breakthrough in the relief of deadly peanut allergy with the discovery of a long-lasting treatment they say offers hope that a cure will soon be possible.

Genetic variants found to play key role in human immune system

August 16, 2017
It is widely recognized that people respond differently to infections. This can partially be explained by genetics, shows a new study published today in Nature Communications by an international collaboration of researchers ...

Study identifies a new way to prevent a deadly fungal infection spreading to the brain

August 16, 2017
Research led by the University of Birmingham has discovered a way to stop a deadly fungus from 'hijacking' the body's immune system and spreading to the brain.

Biophysics explains how immune cells kill bacteria

August 16, 2017
(Tokyo, August 16) A new data analysis technique, moving subtrajectory analysis, designed by researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology, defines the dynamics and kinetics of key molecules in the immune response to an infection. ...

How a nutrient, glutamine, can control gene programs in cells

August 15, 2017
The 200 different types of cells in the body all start with the same DNA genome. To differentiate into families of bone cells, muscle cells, blood cells, neurons and the rest, differing gene programs have to be turned on ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.