Cans lined with Bisphenol A may increase blood pressure

Drinking or eating from cans or bottles lined with Bisphenol A (BPA) could raise your blood pressure, according to new research reported in the American Heart Association's journal Hypertension.

BPA, a chemical used as an epoxy lining for cans and plastic bottles, is everywhere, and its consumption has been associated with high and . Previous studies have shown that BPA can leach into foods and drinks.

"A 5 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure by drinking two canned beverages may cause clinically significant problems, particularly in patients with heart disease or hypertension," said Yun-Chul Hong, M.D., Ph.D., study author and chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine and director of the Environmental Health Center at Seoul National University College of Medicine in South Korea. "A 20 mm Hg increase in doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease."

In this study, researchers conducted a randomized crossover trial recruiting 60 adults, mostly Korean women, over the age of 60 from a local community center. Each trial member visited the study site three times and was randomly provided with soy milk in either glass bottles or cans. Later urine was collected and tested for BPA concentration, blood pressure and heart rate variability two hours after consumption of each beverage.

Urinary BPA concentration increased by up to 1,600 percent after consuming canned beverages compared to after consuming the glass-bottled beverages.

Soy milk was the ideal beverage for the test because it has no known ingredient that elevates blood pressure, researchers said.

The study may provide important information for decision-makers, clinicians and the public on the heart risks associated with BPA, researchers said.

"Thanks to the crossover intervention trial design, we could control most of the potential confounders, such as population characteristics or past medical history. Time variables, such as daily temperatures, however, could still affect the results," Hong said.

"I suggest consumers try to eat fresh foods or glass bottle-contained foods rather than canned foods and hopefully, manufacturers will develop and use healthy alternatives to BPA for the inner lining of can containers," Hong said.


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Journal information: Hypertension

Citation: Cans lined with Bisphenol A may increase blood pressure (2014, December 8) retrieved 22 August 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2014-12-cans-lined-bisphenol-blood-pressure.html
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Jan 06, 2015
It's important to distinguish between plastic sports bottles, commonly referred to as "plastic bottles" or "water bottles," and actual plastic single-serving water bottles, which in the U.S. are almost always made from polyethylene terephthalate, or PET. These single-serving PET water (and soda and juice) bottles do not contain BPA and never have.

BPA is sometimes found, however, in reusable sports bottles made of polycarbonate, and some people refer to these sports bottles as "water bottles." PET bottles used for packaging water are also frequently called "water bottles." When consumers hear that "water bottles" may contain BPA, many mistakenly think they are referring to single-serve bottled water packaged in PET. Again, PET bottles do not contain BPA, and they never have. Those wishing to learn more can visit petresin.org.

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