Sufficient sleep is important for healthy sexual desire

March 16, 2015, Wiley

In a study of 171 women, those who obtained more sleep on a given night experienced greater sexual desire the next day. Reflecting sleep's impact on sexual desire, each additional hour of sleep increased the likelihood of sexual activity with a partner by 14%.

Sleep was also important for genital arousal, such that women who slept longer on average experienced fewer problems with vaginal arousal than women who obtained less .

"The influence of sleep on sexual desire and arousal has received little attention in the field, but these findings indicate that insufficient sleep can decrease sexual desire and arousal for women," said Dr. David Kalmbach, lead author of the Journal of Sexual Medicine study.

"I think the take-home message should not be that more sleep is better, but that it is important to allow ourselves to obtain the sleep that our mind and body needs."

Explore further: Female sexual arousal: Facilitating pleasure and reproduction

More information: Kalmbach, D. A., Arnedt, J. T., Pillai, V. and Ciesla, J. A. (2015), The Impact of Sleep on Female Sexual Response and Behavior: A Pilot Study. Journal of Sexual Medicine. DOI: 10.1111/jsm.12858

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