Factors linked to development of celiac disease identified

May 26, 2015
Factors linked to development of celiac disease identified

(HealthDay)—Certain perinatal factors, including sex of the child, maternal celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes, are associated with development of celiac disease in children, according to a study published in the May issue of Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology.

Louise Emilsson, M.D., Ph.D., from County Council of Värmland in Sweden, and colleagues examined the correlation of fetal growth, , and mode of delivery with . Data were included from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study for 95,200 women and their 114,500 . Within the database, 650 children had celiac disease and 107,828 were identified as controls. Correlations were assessed after adjustment for maternal celiac disease, sex of children, and children's age (model 1) and after adjustment for age of gluten introduction and breastfeeding duration (model 2).

The researchers found that birth weight or height was not associated with celiac disease. There was also no correlation between mode of delivery and celiac disease. Maternal type 2 diabetes and were not associated with development of celiac disease, but maternal celiac disease, adjusted for age and sex of children (odds ratio, 12.45) and type 1 diabetes (odds ratio, 2.58 and 2.61 in models 1 and 2, respectively), was associated with celiac disease.

"Development of celiac disease in children is significantly associated with sex of the child, maternal celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes but not with intrauterine growth," the authors write.

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