Strength-based parenting improves children's resilience and stress levels

May 26, 2015, University of Melbourne
Strength-based parenting improves children’s resilience and stress levels

Children are more likely to use their strengths to effectively cope with minor stress in their life if they have parents who adopt a strength-based approach to parenting.

In a groundbreaking study published recently in the journal Psychology, Professor Lea Waters from the Melbourne Graduate School of Education outlines how children can draw on their personal strengths to cope with the demands that lead to stress.

"While some stress such as caused by a long lasting intense negative experience can have a debilitating effect on the wellbeing of children, not all stress is bad or damaging," Professor Waters said.

"Positive stress is a normal part of the developmental process. When managed well, it has the potential to help children learn, grow and adapt.

"Essential life skills such as coping with and adapting to new situations grow out of positive stress."

The paper, "The relationship between strength-based parenting with children's and strength-based coping approaches," shines new light on how strength based parenting builds up children's resources.

"Strength-based parenting is an approach where parents deliberately identify and cultivate positive states, processes and qualities in their children," Professor Waters said.

"This style of parenting adds a 'positive filter' to the way a child reacts to . It also limits the likelihood of children using avoidance or aggressive coping responses."

This study offers a new avenue for research into the under explored and promising area of positive psychology parenting approaches.

"While the importance of providing love and emotional support to children is well understood, we now know the importance of deliberately identifying and building strengths in our .

"This is a style of parenting which could be increased and is worthy of additional research," Professor Waters concluded.

Explore further: Independent review shows program helps children with disabilities

More information: The Relationship between Strength-Based Parenting with Children's Stress Levels and Strength-Based Coping Approaches,

Related Stories

Independent review shows program helps children with disabilities

April 9, 2015
Parents of children with developmental disabilities can take heart from new research which shows that a University of Queensland program can reduce serious emotional and behavioural problems.

Parenting programs in jail could be positive for mothers, children

September 9, 2014
Mothers in jail would benefit from participation in parenting programs, which could help their children avoid negative outcomes down the road, say researchers at the University of Michigan School of Public Health Prevention ...

New parenting program benefits ADHD children

May 24, 2013
A new program for treating the emotional health of mothers of children with ADHD has shown significant benefits for the children themselves, finds a new study by University of Maryland researchers. The program combines treatment ...

Owning a pet dog can help parents of children with autism

May 21, 2015
A new study has highlighted the potential for pet dogs to reduce stress in parents of children with autism.

Psychology professor investigates how stress affects low-income Richmond-area parents' ability to raise children

November 24, 2014
Over the course of two years, Wendy Kliewer, Ph.D., a psychology professor at Virginia Commonwealth University, surveyed more than 300 low-income female caregivers who were parenting children in the Richmond area to learn ...

CWRU researchers find what stresses parents with a chronically ill child

September 18, 2013
The extra demands on parents of chronically ill children cause stress that affects the whole family, according to a systematic review conducted by Case Western Reserve University researchers that also explored what factors ...

Recommended for you

We can read each other's emotions from surprisingly tiny changes in facial color, study finds

March 19, 2018
Our faces broadcast our feelings in living color—even when we don't move a muscle.

Study with infants suggests language not necessary for reasoning ability

March 16, 2018
A team of researchers from Spain, Hungary and Poland has found via a study with infants that language may not be a necessity for the ability to reason. In their paper published in the journal Science, the group describes ...

Hep C compounds alcoholism's effect on brain volume

March 16, 2018
(HealthDay)—Alcohol dependence has deleterious effects on frontal cortical volumes that are compounded by hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and drug dependence, according to a study published online March 14 in JAMA Psychiatry.

Study casts doubt on ketamine nasal sprays for depression

March 16, 2018
Researchers from the Black Dog Institute and UNSW Sydney have questioned the efficacy and safety of intranasal ketamine for depression, with their pilot trial stopped early due to poor side effects in patients.

Older adults' difficulties with focusing can be used to help put a face to a name

March 16, 2018
Everyone has experienced the awkward situation of meeting someone and then forgetting their name shortly after. Among older adults, this happens more often than not.

A little anger in negotiation pays

March 16, 2018
During negotiations, high-intensity anger elicits smaller concessions than moderate-intensity anger, according to a new study by management and business experts at Rice University and Northwestern University.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.