Study links lower life satisfaction to sleep problems during midlife

June 8, 2015
Credit: Vera Kratochvil/public domain

A new study suggests that lower life satisfaction is linked to sleep problems during midlife.

Respondents with higher reported shorter onset latency (SOL). Sleep onset delay among those with low life could be the result of worry and anxiety, as reported elsewhere. These findings support the idea that life satisfaction is interlinked with many measures of sleep and sleep quality, suggesting that improving one of these variables might result in improving the other.

"These findings support the idea that life satisfaction is interlinked with many measures of sleep and sleep quality, suggesting that improving one of these variables might result in improvement in the other," said lead author Hayley O'Hara, recent graduate of Ohio Northern University.

The research abstract was published recently in an online supplement of the journal Sleep and will be presented Monday, June 8, in Seattle, Washington, at SLEEP 2015, the 29th annual meeting of the Associated Professional Sleep Societies LLC.

The study group comprised 3,950 adults. Fifty-five percent were female and ranged in age from 17 to 74. A 6-item life satisfaction survey was used to code participants as having low, medium, and high levels of satisfaction, and a subjective measure of minutes it takes to fall asleep was used to measure SOL.

Explore further: Couples sleep in sync when the wife is satisfied with their marriage

More information: Abstract Title: The Effect of Life Satisfaction on Sleep Onset Latency During Midlife
Abstract ID: 0089
Presentation Date: Monday, June 8, 2015
Presentation Type: Poster 84
Presentation Time: 4 p.m. to 6 p.m.

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