Study suggests clear connection between wireless devices and cancer

July 25, 2015, Taylor & Francis

A metabolic imbalance caused by radiation from your wireless devices could be the link to a number of health risks, such as various neurodegenerative diseases and cancer, a recent study suggests.

"Oxidative Mechanisms of Biological Activity of Low-intensity Radiofrequency Radiation," a review article published in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, explores experimental data on the of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation in living cells.

This imbalance, also known as oxidative stress, is defined by co-author Dr. Igor Yakymenko as, "an imbalance between the production of (ROS) and antioxidant defence."

Yakymenko explains the due to RFR exposure could explain not only cancer, but also other minor disorders such as headache, fatigue, and skin irritation, which could develop after long-term RFR exposure.

"These data are a clear sign of the real risks this kind of radiation poses for human health," Yakymenko said. 

The article explains that ROS are often produced in cells due to aggressive environments, and can also be provoked by "ordinary wireless radiation."

Up-to-date research demonstrates possible carcinogenic effects of radiofrequency (RFR)/microwave radiation. In 2011, the International Agency for Research on Cancer classified RFR as a possible carcinogen for humans. But clear molecular mechanisms of such effects of RFR were a bottleneck in acceptance of a reality of risk.

The article demonstrates that the hazardous effects of RFR could be realized through the "classical mechanisms" of oxidative impairments in living cells.

Yakymenko and his colleagues call for a precautionary approach in using wireless technologies, such as cell phones and wireless Internet.

Explore further: Blood vessels can actually get better with age

More information: Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine. Posted online on July 7, 2015. DOI: 10.3109/15368378.2015.1043557

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