Type 1 diabetes in childhood may up atopic dermatitis risk

Type 1 diabetes in childhood may up atopic dermatitis risk

(HealthDay)—Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in childhood is associated with increased risk of atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a study published online Sept. 15 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

Chien-Heng Lin, from China Medical University Hospital in Taiwan, and colleagues examined the correlation between T1DM and AD in a population-based, . A total of 3,386 patients with T1DM newly diagnosed from 1998 to 2011 and 12,725 randomly selected controls without T1DM, frequency-matched by age, sex, and year of diagnosis, were identified from claims data of the National Health Insurance program of Taiwan.

The researchers found that the T1DM cohort had a 1.4-fold higher overall AD incidence compared with the nondiabetes cohort (3.31 versus 2.35 per 1,000 person-years). The overall risk of AD remained higher in the T1DM cohort after adjustment for potential risk factors (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.76). T1DM patients with more or hospitalizations had higher risk of subsequent AD (adjusted hazard ratios, 30.1 and 70.3, respectively) compared with the non-T1DM cohort.

"This nationwide, retrospective cohort study demonstrated that childhood T1DM may increase the risk of AD," the authors write.


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Journal information: British Journal of Dermatology

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Citation: Type 1 diabetes in childhood may up atopic dermatitis risk (2015, September 18) retrieved 21 October 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-09-diabetes-childhood-atopic-dermatitis.html
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