Research explains limits of cancer immunotherapy drugs

cancer

Immunotherapy treatments have proven wildly successful in treating some patients with cancer. But despite this success, the majority of patients do not respond to the treatments.

A new study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center reveals molecular changes within the tumor that are preventing the immunotherapy drugs from killing off the .

Clinical trials with PD-L1 and PD-1 blockade suggested that tumors with a high number of inflammation-causing T cells were more responsive to the immunotherapy-based PD-L1 and PD-1 inhibitors. Tumors with low inflammation, or low T cells, were less responsive. But what controls T cells in the tumor microenvironment is poorly understood.

"We defined a molecular mechanism to explain why some tumors are inflamed and others are not - and consequently why some will be responsive to therapy and others not," says senior author Weiping Zou, M.D., Ph.D.

"If we can reprogram this epigenetic mechanism, then the therapy might work for more patients," says Zou, Charles B. de Nancrede Professor of Surgery, Immunology and Biology at the University of Michigan Medical School.

Zou's group was the first to show PD-L1 expression, regulation and functional blockade in in the human cancer microenvironment.

In this study, published in Nature, researchers studied human and mouse models of . They applied epigenetic drugs and found that the numbers of T in the tumor increased. They also saw that the epigenetic drugs synergized the anti-tumor effect of PD-L1 blockade in their models.

"We hope this could be developed into a clinical trial testing a combination of PD-L1 and PD-1 blockade with epigenetic therapy. We want to see if we can make the responders more responsive and turn the non-responders into responders," Zou says.


Explore further

Identifying protein that may predict response to PD-1 immunotherapy for melanoma

More information: Nature, "Epigenetic silencing of Th1 type chemokines shapes tumor immunity and immunotherapy," published online Oct. 26, 2015. DOI: 10.1038/nature15520
Journal information: Nature

Citation: Research explains limits of cancer immunotherapy drugs (2015, October 26) retrieved 21 August 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-10-limits-cancer-immunotherapy-drugs.html
This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.
67 shares

Feedback to editors

User comments

Nov 10, 2015
Father of Oncology Explains Limits of Cancer Immunotherapy Drugs. Immunotherapy is the fruition of a century-old idea. But what if cancer loves iron (cancer is a disease of iron-overloaded cells); researchers love money? Direct intratumoral injections of iron-deficiency agents/substances (ceramic needles) are needed when tumors/metastases cannot be removed with surgery (ceramic blades), the Father of Oncology explains. Unfortunately, the immune system (which is made up of special cells, proteins, tissues, and organs) cannot recognize and attack cancerous cells (iron-overloaded cells). Iron overload is not a crime, iron-overloaded cells are not our enemies, the immune system thinks. Primary tumors always develop at body sites of excessive iron deposits; such deposits can be inherited or acquired, the Father of Oncology thinks. http://www.medica...s/191369 ; https://plus.goog...SqVBV9DS ; https://www.faceb...apoval.5

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more