Study reveals a key role your gut bacteria play in body's self-defense

October 19, 2015 by David Callahan
A diagram illustrates the relationship between the mouse's gut bacteria and the regulation of glutathione in the liver and colon. Credit: KTH Royal Institute of Technology

Chalk up another reason why your gut bacteria are so critical to your health—and why these microorganisms could be the key to preventing a host of diseases. Scientists in Sweden have discovered that human intestinal flora regulate the levels of the body's main antioxidant, glutathione, which fights a host of diseases.

The study could lead to new probiotic-delivering foods, and a better understanding of the behind diseases such as type 2 diabetes, says co-author Adil Mardinoglu, a researcher at Stockholm's KTH Royal Institute of Technology.

Published in the scientific journal, Molecular Systems Biology, the findings help complete our understanding of how nonessential are synthesized to equip the body's cells with detoxifying agents and antioxidants, Mardinoglu says.

"Gut microbiota regulate your glutathione and amino acid metabolism—not only in the small intestine but also in the liver and the colon," he says. 

The is host to more than 1,000 known different species of bacteria. Some of these microbiota were found to be consume glycine, which is one of the three amino acids required for the synthesis of the body's glutathione. In a test with bacteria-free mice, the researchers measured the level of the amino acids in the portal vein, the main vessel that drains blood from the gastrointestinal tract and spleen to the liver. They found a lower level of glycine in the liver and colon tissues, which indicated that the gut bacteria regulates glutathione metabolism in those organs, too.

Mardinoglu points out that since decreased levels of glycine and other amino acids have been linked to type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic and other metabolism-related disorders, further study of microbial amino acids in the human gastrointestinal tract could shed light on the development of these diseases.

A generic map of mouse metabolism was created and tissue-specific computer models for major mouse tissues were generated. Through integration of high throughput experimental data, the researcher found that the microbiota in the small intestine consumes glycine which is one of the three amino acids required for the synthesis of the glutathione. The results were confirmed in live lab tests. Credit: KTH Royal Institute of Technology

The link between and glutathione metabolism could lead to the development of food products that can deliver beneficial bacteria, or probiotics, to the gut," Mardinoglu says. "These results can be used to understand how bacteria play a role in the metabolic processes involved in the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease as well as malnutrition."

Explore further: New discoveries linking gut bacteria with cholesterol metabolism give hope for the future

More information: Mardinoglu A, Shoaie S, Bergentall M, Ghaffari P, Zhang C, Larsson E, Bäckhed F, Nielsen J (2015), The gut microbiota modulates host amino acid and glutathione metabolism in mice, Molecular Systems Biology, 11: 834. msb.embopress.org/content/11/10/834

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5 comments

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Squirrel
5 / 5 (1) Oct 19, 2015
If you want to read the paper, the above link goes to open access text and pdf.
JVK
1 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2015
Except: "Gut microbiota regulate your glutathione and amino acid metabolism—not only in the small intestine but also in the liver and the colon," he says.

This open access journal article links the nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction in mice to humans via metabolic networks linked to genetic networks in the context of "fish odor syndrome." http://www.ncbi.n...24693353

Excerpt: "The result of this synergy is (1) a liver enzyme that oxidizes trimethylamine to (2) an odor that causes (3) species-specific behaviors. Thus, the complex systems that biology required to get from nutrient acquisition and nutrient metabolism to species-specific odor-controlled behavior is exemplified by adaptive evolution of an attractive odor to mice that repels rats (see for review Li et al., 2013)."

The moth model links microbes to humans via the same molecular mechanisms.
http://phys.org/n...xta.html
Vietvet
3 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2015
Nutrient-dependent/pheromone-controlled adaptive evolution: a model.
Kohl JV1.
http://www.ncbi.n...24693353

JVK's model destroyed.
http://www.ncbi.n...4049134/
Captain Stumpy
3 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2015
apophenia from jvk
This open access journal article links the nutrient-dependent pheromone-controlled physiology of reproduction
By all means, please specifically demonstrate and show in the linked open access journal link you provided LINKS reproduction with "Gut microbiota regulate your glutathione and amino acid metabolism—not only in the small intestine but also in the liver and the colon"

you claim the journal article LINKS reproduction with the Gut microbiota, so PLEASE SHOW THIS IN THE ARTICLE
http://www.ncbi.n...24693353
a far better link would be here
http://www.socioa...ew/24367

or read about your failure here
http://freethough...s-place/

PS the quote you gave is NOT found in the first link (the actual SCIENCE), it is found in your model (the PSEUDOSCIENCE)

reported for pseudoscience
JVK
1 / 5 (2) Oct 19, 2015
See also: http://stanmed.st...our.html

Obviously, the moth model links microbes to humans via the same molecular mechanisms that enable protection from virus-driven genomic entropy by nutrient-dependent RNA-mediated amino acid substitutions and the supercoiling of DNA.

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