Dietary potassium may help prevent kidney and heart problems in diabetics

Diets rich in potassium may help protect the heart and kidney health of patients with type 2 diabetes, according to a study appearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN).

Individuals with type 2 are at increased risk of developing and heart disease. To examine whether higher intake sodium and potassium are associated with these risks, Shin-ichi Araki, MD, PhD (Shiga University of Medical Science, in Japan) and his colleagues studied a group of 623 patients with type 2 diabetes and normal function. Patients were enrolled between 1996 and 2003 and were followed-up until 2013.

Higher levels of urinary potassium excretion, which closely correlate with intake amounts, were linked with a slower decline of kidney function and a lower incidence of cardiovascular complications. Sodium levels were not associated with kidney or heart health during follow-up.

"For many individuals with diabetes, the most challenging part of a treatment plan is to determine what to eat. The results in our study highlight the importance of a diet high in in diabetes nutrition therapy," said Dr. Araki.


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More information: The article, entitled "Urinary Potassium Excretion and Renal and Cardiovascular Complications in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Normal Renal Function," will appear online on November 12, 2015. DOI: 10.2215/CJN.00980115
Citation: Dietary potassium may help prevent kidney and heart problems in diabetics (2015, November 12) retrieved 26 May 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2015-11-dietary-potassium-kidney-heart-problems.html
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