Researchers map mosquitoes that transmit Zika and Dengue by county

Researchers map mosquitoes that transmit Zika and Dengue by county
This map shows counties where Aedes aegypti was reported between Jan. 1, 1995, and March 2016. Counties shown in yellow had records for one year within that time period; those shown in orange had two years of presence records, and those shown in red had three or more years of presence records. Credit: Entomological Society of America

The mosquitoes known as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus transmit arboviruses that are increasing threats to human health in the Americas, particularly dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses. Therefore, accurate and up-to-date information for the geographical ranges of these mosquitoes have been urgently needed to guide surveillance and enhance control capacity for these mosquitoes.

A new article published in the Journal of Medical Entomology features maps of counties in the United States where these mosquitoes have been recorded, based on records from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ArboNET database, VectorMap, the published literature, a survey of mosquito control agencies, university researchers, and state and local health departments.

Between January 1995 and March 2016, 183 counties from 26 states and the District of Columbia reported the occurrence of Aedes aegypti, and 1,241 counties from 40 states and the District of Columbia reported the occurrence of Aedes albopictus.

"Our findings underscore the need for systematic surveillance of Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus in the United States and delineate areas with risk for the transmission of these introduced arboviruses," the authors wrote.

Researchers map mosquitoes that transmit Zika and Dengue by county
This map shows counties where Aedes albopictus was reported between Jan. 1, 1995, and March 2016. Counties shown in yellow had records for one year within that time period; those shown in orange had two years of presence records, and those shown in red had three or more years of presence records. Credit: Entomological Society of America

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More information: Reported Distribution of Aedes (Stegomyia) aegypti and Aedes (Stegomyia) albopictus in the United States, 1995-2016 (Diptera: Culicidae), DOI: dx.doi.org/10.1093/jme/tjw072 , jme.oxfordjournals.org/content … 016/06/07/jme.tjw072
Journal information: Journal of Medical Entomology

Citation: Researchers map mosquitoes that transmit Zika and Dengue by county (2016, June 9) retrieved 22 October 2019 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2016-06-mosquitoes-transmit-zika-dengue-county.html
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Jun 10, 2016
Prevent Malaria, Zika, Dengue, Typhus, Yellow Fever & West Nile Virus

Based on the 2009 Study "Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciencias"

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