Few changes in employer-sponsored insurance 2013-2014

October 31, 2016

(HealthDay)—Private sector employer-sponsored health insurance offerings were similar in 2013 and 2014, with <3.5 percent of employers dropping coverage and 1.1 percent adding coverage, according to a report published online Oct. 26 in Health Affairs.

Jean Abraham, Ph.D., at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues used data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey-Insurance Component to examine the extent to which employers dropped or added health insurance between 2013 and 2014.

The researchers found that in both years 46.38 percent of private-sector employers offered coverage and 49.08 percent did not offer it. Between the two years, only 3.45 percent of employers dropped coverage and 1.10 percent added coverage.

"In the first year after implementation of the major Affordable Care Act coverage provisions, we found that employer-sponsored insurance remained largely stable, with the vast majority of establishments not changing their offering status," the authors write.

Explore further: Opioid-related insurance claims rise 3,000 percent

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