Surgeons remove thyroid gland through hidden incision underneath the lip

November 30, 2016, The Mount Sinai Hospital
William B. Inabnet III performs TOETVA. Credit: Mount Sinai Health System

A team of surgeons at Mount Sinai Beth Israel (MSBI), led by William B. Inabnet III, MD, the Eugene W. Friedman, MD, Professor of Surgery and Chair for the Department of Surgery at MSBI and Chief of Endocrine Surgery Quality for the Mount Sinai Health System, have performed the first endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy in New York, and one of the first of its kind in the nation. Their initial case, which is the first published report in the United States, was recently described in the journal Surgical Endoscopy.

With the assistance of Gustavo Fernandez-Ranvier, MD, and Hyunsuk Suh, MD, both Assistant Professors in the Department of Surgery at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Dr. Inabnet removed the by making three small incisions inside the mouth underneath the lower lip. He inserted ports through the incisions, including an endoscope - a medical device with a light and camera. Once a working space within the neck area was created, Dr. Inabnet preserved the critical structures and removed the thyroid gland through the largest of the incisions. This minimally-invasive procedure leaves a hidden scar compared to the conventional transcervical approach, which leaves a visible scar on the patient's neck.

"Out of all of the approaches, this is the one type of thyroid operation where there is no sign that the patient underwent surgery," said Dr. Inabnet. "This procedure is best equipped for smaller nodules and early-stage papillary thyroid cancer. I anticipate it will evolve for other applications going forward."

A team of Mount Sinai surgeons, led by Dr. William B. Inabnet III, perform an endoscopic transoral thyroidectomy. Credit: Mount Sinai Health System

Dr. Inabnet and his team specialize in a group of operations known as hidden-scar endoscopic thyroid surgery, which includes the transaxillary approach where incisions are made under the armpit, and the bilateral axillary breast approach, also known as BABA, where four small are made in hidden locations on the chest.

"The transoral route is a natural addition to our growing program of minimally invasive techniques," said Dr. Inabnet. "We now have the ability to approach the thyroid gland from below, from the side, or from above through the mouth."

Dr. Inabnet has pioneered new techniques in minimally invasive endocrine neck surgery as well as adrenal and pancreatic surgery. In 1998, he helped perform the first endoscopic thyroid resection in the United States (the second in the world) and has advanced the field of video-endoscopic neck .

Explore further: New approach to thyroid surgery eliminates neck scar

Related Stories

New approach to thyroid surgery eliminates neck scar

August 9, 2011
As the rate of thyroid cancer continues to climb, doctors are urging patients to be more cautious about thyroid nodules, a common disorder that is responsible for a small but growing number of thyroid cancer cases. Thyroid ...

Removal of lobe instead of total thyroid may benefit papillary thyroid cancer patients

October 19, 2016
Most Americans with thyroid cancer have an operation to remove the thyroid gland, but those with a smaller, less-threatening form of thyroid cancer may be missing out on a less extensive, less costly, and safer operation ...

Recommended for you

Amount of weight regain after bariatric surgery helps predict health risks

October 16, 2018
Measuring the percentage of weight regained following the maximum amount of weight lost after bariatric surgery can help predict a patient's risk of several serious health problems, according to a long-term, multicenter study ...

Technique to 'listen' to a patient's brain during tumour surgery

October 16, 2018
Surgeons could soon eavesdrop on a patient's brain activity during surgery to remove their brain tumour, helping improve the accuracy of the operation and reduce the risk of impairing brain function.

Researchers link gut bacteria to heart transplant success or failure

October 4, 2018
In a new study, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine (UMSOM) have found that the gut microbiome appears to play a key role in how well the body accepts a transplanted heart. The scientists found a ...

Focus on neuroscience, nociception to improve anesthesia, paper says

October 1, 2018
People sometimes mistakenly think of general anesthesia as just a really deep sleep but in fact, anesthesia is really four brain states—unconsciousness, amnesia, immobility and suppression of the body's damage sensing response, ...

Bariatric surgery linked to safer childbirth for the mother

September 27, 2018
Obese mothers who lose weight through bariatric surgery can have safer deliveries. The positive effects are many, including fewer caesarean sections, infections, tears and haemorrhages, and fewer cases of post-term delivery ...

Antibiotics for appendicitis? Surgery often not needed

September 25, 2018
When emergency tests showed the telltale right-sided pain in Heather VanDusen's abdomen was appendicitis, she figured she'd be quickly wheeled into surgery. But doctors offered her the option of antibiotics instead.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.